Promoting Your Craft Beer Bar through Social Media

Craft beer marketing becomes more fun as you learn to integrate social media into
it. Craft beer may only represent a small percentage of the beer market but the
number of craft beer drinkers tends to increase over time.
You can connect with your current and potential clients through social media. In this
article, we’ll give you a few advice on how get those customers coming through the
help of social media.

Screen Shot 2013-09-03 at 1.34.09 PM
Use a #hashtag
In order to successfully promote your business via social media, you’ll have to use a
language that social media users know best – hashtags. This makes your
promotions more viral and personal.
Also, it is important to note that people between the ages of 21 to 28 are your
target audience. They are also the biggest social media users. You don’t need to be
a genius in order to match the connection between these two. Use a hashtag,
attract more customers and be rewarded with a batch of new customers.

Get your followers to take picture and post it on different social media
platforms
This is important as people trust the recommendations of someone they personally
know. This does not only help you reach more customers, it also gives people the
idea that your customers are having a great time.
Feel free to run a contest and encourage your followers to post their photos in
Facebook or Instagram. This will be a perfect way of building your beer tribe.

Keep them updated
Beer drinkers would be interested to know what you’re offering. These people
would be more than willing to visit your bar if you have what they want. Take a
photo and have it uploaded on your page. Mind you, photos are more effective than
plain texts.

Feed your followers with daily updates, photos or just about anything you want
them to know about your business. It is important to keep your page up to date and
encourage them to like, comment or share.

Promoting Your Craft Beer Bar through Social Media

Craft Beer is Growing in US Market

Craft beer marketing becomes more fun as you learn to integrate social media into
it. Craft beer may only represent a small percentage of the beer market but the
number of craft beer drinkers tends to increase over time.
You can connect with your current and potential clients through social media. In this
article, we’ll give you a few advice on how get those customers coming through the
help of social media.

Use a #hashtag
In order to successfully promote your business via social media, you’ll have to use a
language that social media users know best – hashtags. This makes your
promotions more viral and personal.
Also, it is important to note that people between the ages of 21 to 28 are your
target audience. They are also the biggest social media users. You don’t need to be
a genius in order to match the connection between these two. Use a hashtag,
attract more customers and be rewarded with a batch of new customers.
Get your followers to take picture and post it on different social media
platforms

This is important as people trust the recommendations of someone they personally
know. This does not only help you reach more customers, it also gives people the
idea that your customers are having a great time.
Feel free to run a contest and encourage your followers to post their photos in
Facebook or Instagram. This will be a perfect way of building your beer tribe.

Keep them updated
Beer drinkers would be interested to know what you’re offering. These people
would be more than willing to visit your bar if you have what they want. Take a
photo and have it uploaded on your page. Mind you, photos are more effective than
plain texts.

Feed your followers with daily updates, photos or just about anything you want
them to know about your business. It is important to keep your page up to date and
encourage them to like, comment or share.

Brewing an Effective Craft Beer Label

Whether you’re brewing beer as a hobby or business, you have to take into account what your drinkers see on the bottle as they sample your beer. Craft beer calls for a label design which is unique and stylish.

Instead of just slapping the word “light” on the beer bottle, think of a creative approach on how to introduce it to the beer drinking community. Mind you, these labels have a big influence on the perceived quality of your beer. Thus, explaining the need for breweries to create a distinct brand identity.

Understanding the history of craft beer

By learning how microbreweries have evolved, you can fully appreciate the craft beer industry and the people who have managed to make it thrive up to this day. It could also help you spark some ideas for creative direction like how you want the beer drinking community to remember your beer and your company.

Be remarkable to set yourself apart

One sure way of failing in this industry is by being boring. You have to be remarkable in order to be successful.

Craft beer consumers are receptive of designs that are different from the norms. Also, they choose their favorite beer according to its brand, not the beer process or brewing style.

Pay attention to details

If your beer isn’t seasonal, you can add in a bit of creativity by replacing the usual label with a holiday version. This simple move could help boost sales. Also, don’t forget to incorporate the beer’s distinguishing style into the new packaging.

The cap should also be part of your beer branding so don’t forget to include it in the conceptualization stage.

Make your design specific, brief and clear

When conceptualizing your beer label design, you have to tell the designer exactly what you’re looking to achieve. Here, it is important to provide details about your history, beer style, brewery location and your target audience.

You can also provide samples of label styles, color swatches and fonts that you like to give inspiration to the designer.

Marketing your Beer Event through Social Media

If you’re planning a beer event, social media could be an efficient and cost-effective way of creating buzz, filling seats and turning your one-time gathering into a recurring event.

In order to successfully promote your event, you should know which type of social media tools to use and when you should use them. Listed below are a few tips that could help you organize a successful event.

Before the event

The first step is to let people know about your event and make sure they mark it on their calendars. You can do this through Twitter.

Raise awareness twitter

A lot of business owners have their own hashtags for their events. While there’s no secret formula in creating one, just try to incorporate a hashtag in all your tweets and encourage others to do the same when tweeting about your event.

In order to encourage people to use the hashtag, you can sweeten the deal by giving out a free pass to one of the lucky followers.

During the event

Just because the event has already started, doesn’t mean that your marketing efforts have to end there. Since most beer events are held at night, you can keep the foot traffic high and the excitement up by continuously updating your followers through social media all night.

Foursquare or Gowalla

Creating an event in Foursquare or Gowalla is free. By creating one, attendees would be encouraged to check in on your event and share them via social media.

Since a lot of people link their Gowalla and Foursquare activity to their Facebook and Twitter accounts, check-ins would be seen by their friends; thus, encouraging their friends to come to your event.

After the event

Blog about it

Create a blog post on how the event went and how you plan to make the next even more exciting. Also, feel free to ask for feedbacks and suggestions from the attendees. This way, you’ll have a better idea on what to do next time.

You can also post a status on your Facebook page about the event and encourage your followers to leave a comment as well.

There are still a lot of ways to promote your event via social media. You just have to be a bit creative in order to attract the attention of people.

The Basics of Beer Marketing

Craft beer is one of the most profitable and fastest growing segments of the beer industry. It’s also a very competitive and crowded market, so you’ll have to work hard and stand out among the competition if you wish to succeed in this industry.

In this business, success could be translated to being different. This article could help you in focusing on the key factors that would contribute to your business’ success.

Know the market

Every market is unique. Thus, you’ll have to understand what makes you area different in order to build a profitable business.

Here, you should be able to gather as much information about beer drinkers (your prospective clients) and your competitors. As you learn more about your prospects and competitors, you’ll be able to come up with an effective marketing plan that would set you apart from these existing establishments, reach your target audience and penetrate the market.

Create your brand

Your brand is more than just a logo. It’s how you present your business to your customers. A great brand provides its clients with an interesting story. As you introduce your brand to the market, you’ll want to capture their attention and connect with your customers.

Once you capture their attention, this becomes the core of your identity. If possible, try to incorporate it through your marketing plan in order to create a more powerful presence.

Improve your product

More than anything, your product will be the center of your business. So, it is important to provide your customers with a great product. Also, device a plan on how to carry your brand story through the product you offer.

Create excitement among your customers

Getting your customers excited is an important aspect of your marketing plan. Execute your plans early on and engage beer drinkers to follow you until your launching day. A lot of beer drinkers get thrilled with the introduction of new breweries. By going with the right approach, you could easily create a buzz among the beer drinking community even before you start selling.

By putting up your own site combined with the power of social media, you can easily reach your target audience and provide them with the necessary information as you prepare for the launch of your brewery.

 

The 5 Best Beers to Share for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving dinner calls for some class. Wine is the obvious choice, but if your apron is selvedge and your turkey is heirloom, your tipple should be similarly trad. And that means beer. Here are a few great beer suggestions to bring to your Thanksgiving celebration.

Logsdon Seizoen Bretta, 8.0%

This true-to-the-name farmhouse brewery makes one kind of beer: saison. And they make it well. Run by the mad, yeast-wrangling genius behind Wyeast, Logsdon isn’t afraid to play with untraditional fermentations. This particular brew is spiked with brettanomyces, a wild yeast that gives it an extra-dry kick and a boisterous boost of carbonation — my bottle gushed like something possessed; keep a towel handy. When the head dies down, you’ll taste hay, horses, and funk with a prickling, appetite-whetting finish. Start your meal here.

Deschutes Chasin’ Freshies, 7.2% 
Ring in the harvest with this fresh-hopped IPA, dosed with just-picked Amarillos straight from the Washington farm that first discovered the now-classic strain. But don’t  fear: this is no palate-wrecking, resinously bitter boozer like other big IPAs. The orange-blossomy hops are kept well in check, their citrussy oils turning more refreshing than overpowering, making the beer a great spritzy intermezzo.

North Coast Old Stock 2011 Reserve, 15.2%
Classically British, with rich Maris Otter barley and flowery Fuggle and Golding hops, this winter warmer is as close to port as beer can safely get, packed with  chewy, butter-toffee sweetness. Used to be, stock ales like this were brewed on a first son’s birth and not cracked until the heir turned 18. Strong enough to stand a year or more in the cellar, save a bottle for later — if you can.

Firestone Anniversary Ale XVII, 13.3%
Firestone is a barreled-beer specialist, its cellar masters keeping watch over some 1,500 casks at a newly-built satellite brewery focusing just on wood-aging. Their Anniversary releases put that archive to use. This year’s is a blend of seven of Firestone’s barrel-aged beers, including classics like Double DBA and some unexpected twists like a blonde barley wine with tropical El Dorado hops called Helldorado, all mixed by a team of local winemakers. It’s dark and rich and dizzying strong, nutty sweet and glazed with caramel. Have your rum cake, and drink it too.

The Bruery Oude Tart, 7.5%
A Flemish-style red ale, aged in wine barrels for a year and a half, Oude Tart is sweetly sour, like high-octane balsamic vinegar drizzled on cherries. It’s a perfect cleansing dessert when the gravy boat runs dry — a near-repentant tangy slap to smack the grease off your palate.

Read More http://www.gq.com/life/food/201311/the-5-best-large-format-beers-for-thanksgiving-dinner#ixzz2llwwAlTT

5 Clues to Deciphering Craft Beer Styles

Understanding what a beer might taste like from its name alone can be a little daunting. Despite the craft beer community’s welcoming nature, it is easy to see why newcomers might feel lost when looking at a beer menu. Wheat, weizen and wit—each are different styles with specific histories and characteristics, but all are fairly similar in composition. It can be confusing!

While some beer styles require a bit of background to understand, one can often make reasonable assumptions about a beer’s character with a small amount of information. Here is a list of five clues that will help you quickly decipher what a beer might taste like before ordering that we wanted to share!

1. Origin/Region

A beer style’s country or region of origin goes a long way in providing clues to what the beer might taste like. The classic beer styles were developed over hundreds of years and were greatly impacted by regional and environmental variables like geography, climate and water chemistry.

Is it impossible to make a German lager outside of Germany? Of course not! As world travel became easier and the science of brewing was better understood, brewers began to mimic water qualities of specific regions and wrangle yeast cells to attain beer qualities once unique to certain ares of the world. Today, many American craft brewers have become skilled at brewing lagers similar to those originally crafted in Bavaria, hoppy IPAs reminiscent of the Burton-on-Trent region (Staffordshire, UK), roasty stouts indicative of Dublin, Ireland, and even the mysteriously tart and complex beers of Flanders, Belgium.

Of course there are exceptions to every rule, but these geographic-centric terms found in beer style names can offer clues about a beer’s character.

Origin Clues

  • German-style | lager with complex malt character and floral hops
  • Belgian-style | fruity, spicy ales or sour beers
  • English-style | pale ales, porters and stouts with earthy hop character
  • American-style | hop-forward beers with flavors of pine, citrus and resin
  • Belgo-American | fruity and spicy Belgian yeast flavor with American-style hop character

2. Color

You eat with your eyes, right? Well, you drink with them too. Colors play a factor in beer appreciation and have become popular for naming derivatives of classic styles (e.g., black IPA, white IPA). Classic beer styles include a fair number of beers named after their color, and you can often make a good guess of a beer’s malt flavor just by knowing its name and seeing it in a glass.

Color Clues

  • Light/Pale | Flavors: grainy, bread-like | Styles: blonde ale, helles, Belgian-style wit
  • Amber | Flavors: toasty, bread crust | Styles: amber ale, amber lager
  • Brown | Flavors: toast, roasted nuts, chocolate | Styles: brown ale, Marzen, dopplebock
  • Black | Flavors: burnt toast, dark chocolate, coffee, espresso | Styles: dry stout, robust porter, American black ale

3. Special Ingredients

There is no better clue when anticipating what a beer may taste like than having one or more of the star ingredients in the name. Some of these ingredients are so popular that they have become recognized with their own style categories. Special ingredients range in intensity, but there is usually an expectation that the brewer will aim to strike a balance, ensuring that the base style still prevails while the added notes sing.

Common Special Ingredients

  • Chocolate
  • Coffee
  • Fruit | raspberries, strawberries, peaches, cherries, etc.
  • Herb and Spices | cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, heather, etc.

4. Yeast

The type of yeast used in a style has a great impact on the final beer. The standard explanation is that beer is divided into two categories: ales and lagers. Of course, like with most things, a gray area exists. Today’s brewers are using nontraditional yeasts, blending different types of yeast and using traditional yeast in untraditional ways. It’s not quite as cut and dry as ale and lager, but some generalities do exist.

Ales

Ales ferment at warmer temperatures; because of this, they often present more yeast-derived flavors (fruity, sometimes spicy). Usually when you see the term ale, you can anticipate that yeast flavors provide some, if not much, of the flavor you will experience. When you enjoy a Belgian-style dubbel, you tend to taste a lot of fruit. Fruit flavors don’t necessarily mean that there is fruit in the beer, but rather that the yeast used has provided those flavors. We call fruity yeast flavors esters. A common example of esters is seen in German weizens, in the flavor perceived as banana.

Lagers

Lagers ferment at cooler temperatures and create a much “cleaner” beer, allowing you to taste the malt and hops more explicitly. As a test, try tasting an amber ale and amber lager side by side. Both will have generally the same ingredients, but the flavors will differ because of the yeast that was used.

5. Vessel/ Vintage/ Volume

Vessel

Beer that has been aged can pick up the flavors of the vessel it has spent time in. Barrels, are one of the most common aging vessels. If a barrel has never been used, the beer can present flavors of the wood itself, usually oak. Oak flavors can be spicy, woody or even vanilla-like, depending on how the barrel was prepared. If the barrel had been previously used for another beverage (wine or spirits), there may be some residual flavors from those present as well. So if you don’t like the taste of bourbon, beware of a bourbon barrel-aged beer.

Vintage

A vintage denotes the year a beer was produced. While in most cases beer should be enjoyed fresh, there are certain styles that can develop positively when aged. If you see that a beer has a vintage, you can assume it has a relatively high ABV, as alcohol has preservative qualities. Additionally, you might expect the flavors to be more complex when compared to a fresh example of the same beer.

Volume: “These go to 11.”

Volume usually denotes either flavor or strength. Words like “strong,” “sour” and “session” act as clues to what you might experience. These clues, when coupled with your basic understanding of the base style, should allow you to make a solid guess about the beer.

  • Strong ale | an ale of significant alcoholic strength
  • Sweet stout | very dark, sweet, full-bodied, slightly roasty ale
  • Robust porter | substantial, malty dark ale with a complex and flavorful roasty character
  • Session IPA | characteristics of a traditional IPA, but with less alcoholic strength
  • Imperial stout | a stronger version of the original stout style

The Big Picture

Even in the best beer establishments, there won’t always be someone to answer questions about a draught list. Learning the basics about a few of the more common beer styles will go a long way in helping you order something you’ll enjoy!

http://www.craftbeer.com/craft-beer-muses/5-clues-to-deciphering-craft-beer-styles

15 Beer and Wine Facts That May Surprise You

Did you know?

1) One glass of wine is drunk for every three bottles of beer.

 

2) Wine is nearly 50 percent stronger than beer.

 

3) The global beer industry is forecast to have a value of $496.6 billion in 2014. The global wine industry is expected to reach $327.8 billion in 2016.

 

4) Snow Beer in China is the most popular beer, with 74.8 million barrels sold in 2012.

 

5) The four key ingredients in beer are water, yeast, malt and hops. The key ingredient in wine? Grapes.

 

6) In Czech Republic, the average person drinks 346 12-ounce bottles of beer per year — the most of any other country.

 

7) Vatican City consumes more wine than any other country at 365 glasses per year, per person.

 

8) The world’s most expensive wine costs $168,000 per bottle. It is Penfolds Limited Edition Ampoule from Australia. Only 12 bottles exist worldwide.

 

9) Pale lagers and pilsners account for the top 10 most popular beer brands in the world.

 

10) At 65 percent alcohol by volume, Armageddon from Brewmaster in Scotland is the world’s strongest beer.

 

11) Sherry wine has the highest alcohol content by volume at 22 percent, followed by Port Wine at 20 percent.

 

12) At 15 percent per volume, Barley Wine has the highest alcohol content among beer.

 

13) Barley Wine is called ‘wine’ because of its high alcohol content but is actually a style of ale.

 

14) Beer contains high levels of silicon, which have been found to increase mineral density in bones, according to researchers.

 

15) Beer is easiest on the kidneys among alcoholic beverages because it has the highest water content.

 

 

Carlsberg’s latest campaign gets you to share beers instead of links

Carlsberg can be quite creative when it comes to online advertisements such as this one but their latest drinks campaign in Belgium is another smart effort in promoting the brand. Creating an app called Tournée Digitale (Digital Tour), it encourages users to step away from their computers and meet their friends in person and share beers instead of links.

When you download the app, you are automatically entered into a competition where the winners get a free round of beer to share with their friends. When this happens, the app allows you to invite five of your friends to a Carlsberg event or party so you can share your drinks. You can give your Carlsburg drinks their very own name – so long as it ends with the suffix ‘sberg’ – when you’re sharing the free beers.

The final step of treating your friends is to share the news on your Facebook page about being treated by Carlsberg, thus promoting the brand to your other friends as well as a wider audience. The app is available for both iPhone and Android smartphones.

– See more at: http://www.simplyzesty.com/Blog/Article/August-2011/Carlsberg-s-latest-campaign-gets-you-to-share-beers-instead-of-links#sthash.pMU0HlNs.dpuf

8 FOREIGN DRINKING GAMES FROM AROUND THE WORLD

You may be familiar with Flip Cup, Beer Pong and Kings, but what if you came from strange and distant lands and didn’t have access to such ubiquitous American drinking games? Let’s all unite around the world with a drink in our hands and our game faces on for a round of foreign drinking games. Here is a great list we found and wanted to share!

8 Korea – Napkin, Beer, Cigarette

In this game, a napkin with a coin is placed over a glass of beer. Then, the players take turns burning holes into the napkin with their cigarette and the player whose cigarette burn finally drops the coin into the beer has to drink.

Are you asking, “What if they don’t smoke?” Well, to stereotype, that’s not really something to worry about: South Koreans are big, big smokers. But hey, at least this provides something else to do with a cigarette.

7 UK – Pence

This is a party-wide game that’s played in different parts of the UK. A penny is put into circulation and it’s up to everyone to guard their drinks. If someone slips that penny into your drink, you have to chug it down. Then, you ask them the year of the penny and if they don’t know they’ll have to finish their own drink, or grab a fresh one and down it right then and there. Then the penny goes back into circulation.

6 Peru – Sapo

This isn’t a drinking game so much as a game you play as you drink. Sapo (Spanish for frog) is a little golden frog that sit atop the game board, and the object of this game is to throw coins into its mouth (or any of the holes that surround it) from about four or five steps away. This results in a different amount of points per hole, though the best, of course, is getting it right in its mouth – which is incredibly tough.

5 Japan – Ping Pang Pong

One player says “ping,” and the person to their left has to say “pong” right after “ping” comes out of the first person’s mouth. Then, the next person to their left says “pang” while simultaneously pointing to another person who starts the entire process over. If you are too slow or do a poor job of pointing (which I guess can happen if you’re drunk enough) everyone chants while you drink your liquor in shame.

4 Germany – Hammerschlagen

For this, uh, game, every player sticks a nail in a tree, so that it’s ready to be pounded into it. Each person gets a swing and then passes their hammer on. The first person to sink their nail in gets a free shot and the last person has to buy the next round. And if you miss the nail completely there’s a penalty which can vary. Is it me, or does Hammerschlagen sound like some type of German holiday that Dwight Schrute would get really excited about?

3 Ireland – Irish Quarters

Different from our version of quarters, this involves players spinning a coin and taking a mug of beer to the face, refilling the cup and then grabbing the coin before it stops spinning. If they can’t finish and pour in time, then instead of passing the coin to the next person they have to go again.

2 Cuba – Jenga Drinking Game

Jenga is all about building a tower of rectangular wooden blocks and then systematically removing them from lower levels and stacking them on the top level without the whole tower falling over. The Cubans just add rum to the equation. Any time you make the tower fall, you finish what’s left in your glass, even if you’ve just filled it. There is no winner or loser, just an end to the game when everyone is too inebriated to set up the tower. Using board games and such to get wasted is a great idea. I’d love to see a Mouse Trap drinking game.

1 Russia – Bear Paw

This game involves filling a mug with beer and passing it around a circle, with each person taking a sip. After taking a drink, they replace that amount with vodka. Then, the mug gets passed around until it’s just vodka with no more beer. Annnnd then it’s done again, but backwards.

Is there a goal in Bear Paw? I think you’re basically the winner if you live through the night. To quote Mojo Jojo from Powerpuff Girls, “That’s the most evilest thing I can imagine.”