The Basics of Home Brewing

 

If you are a beer lover, you may have considered brewing beer at the comfort of your home. It’s not only economical; it’s also a great hobby that you could share with your friends. And by the end of your project, you’ll be welcomed with a cold glass of your very own beer.

Purchase a starter kit

As you begin to explore the art of brewing beer, getting a starting kit would be your best option. This kit contains all the supplies and equipments which are needed for home brewing, plus, detailed instructions also come with the package. This is especially recommended for beginners as you’ll be provided with everything you need for this project.

Prepare the ingredients

Surprisingly, beer involves a simple process. It’s basically just water with malt.

Most of the time, the ingredients needed in brewing are included in the home brew starter kit. As you master the art of brewing beer, you can start experimenting and add in hops, grains and malts. These could provide an added flavor to your beer.

Brewing the beer

Brewing beer is easy, especially if you’re using a starter kit. Follow these steps and start brewing your own beer.

Brewing – This process takes about 2 hours.

Start off by cleaning and sterilizing your equipments. Dissolve the brew in 2 to 4 liters of hot water then add in 1 Kg of dextrose or sugar. Then, put 10 liters of cold water in the fermenter, add the hot mixture and mix it well.

Top it up to 23 liters. When the temperature reaches below 30°, sprinkle it with brewer’s yeast.

Fermenting – This process takes about a week

This is where the magic happens! After adding the yeast, you can now seal the fermenter. Remember to partially fill the airlock with boiled, cooled water.

Allow the brew to ferment for a week, letting it stay at about 20 to 22°. Once you notice that the brew clears and the airlock stops bubbling, set aside for 48 hours. After this, you beer is ready for bottling.

Bottling

Make sure to sterilize all the caps and bottles. Add 1 tablespoon of sugar to each bottle. Fill the bottles, leaving 40mm from the top.

Cover the bottles and tilt each bottle for a few times in order to dissolve the sugar. Keep them in a warm place for about 5 days, then transfer them to a cooler place and let it stay for another 5 days. Leave it alone for another week. After this, you are free to enjoy your very own beer.

Marketing your Beer Event through Social Media

If you’re planning a beer event, social media could be an efficient and cost-effective way of creating buzz, filling seats and turning your one-time gathering into a recurring event.

In order to successfully promote your event, you should know which type of social media tools to use and when you should use them. Listed below are a few tips that could help you organize a successful event.

Before the event

The first step is to let people know about your event and make sure they mark it on their calendars. You can do this through Twitter.

Raise awareness twitter

A lot of business owners have their own hashtags for their events. While there’s no secret formula in creating one, just try to incorporate a hashtag in all your tweets and encourage others to do the same when tweeting about your event.

In order to encourage people to use the hashtag, you can sweeten the deal by giving out a free pass to one of the lucky followers.

During the event

Just because the event has already started, doesn’t mean that your marketing efforts have to end there. Since most beer events are held at night, you can keep the foot traffic high and the excitement up by continuously updating your followers through social media all night.

Foursquare or Gowalla

Creating an event in Foursquare or Gowalla is free. By creating one, attendees would be encouraged to check in on your event and share them via social media.

Since a lot of people link their Gowalla and Foursquare activity to their Facebook and Twitter accounts, check-ins would be seen by their friends; thus, encouraging their friends to come to your event.

After the event

Blog about it

Create a blog post on how the event went and how you plan to make the next even more exciting. Also, feel free to ask for feedbacks and suggestions from the attendees. This way, you’ll have a better idea on what to do next time.

You can also post a status on your Facebook page about the event and encourage your followers to leave a comment as well.

There are still a lot of ways to promote your event via social media. You just have to be a bit creative in order to attract the attention of people.

Top Winter Beers at Colorado’s Craft Breweries

One of the most glorious and distinct harbingers of winter in Colorado is the appearance of seasonal beers. Winter is the time to take advantage of flavors such as roasted malts, chocolate, pepper spice and caramel. Below are a few winter warmers from Colorado craft breweries to keep an eye out for, according to Colorado.com.

Left Hand Brewery in Longmont boasts two winter brews. Fade to Black, which was the 2010 Great American Beer Festival’s Gold Medal-winner (foreign stout category), has rich notes of licorice, espresso bean and molasses. Good Juju, the reincarnation of the former year-round offering Juju Ginger, is a bit lighter but has the seasonal spiciness that only comes from brewing with pungent ginger.

It’s said that the San Juan Mountain snowpack is responsible for the quality and freshness of the Winter Ale from Durango Brewing Co. Those who live in this southwestern town demand great après-ski beers, and this ale, with a lightly fruity taste and cocoa finish delivers. Plus, it’s available by the growler from the Main Ave. Tap Room, making it easy to enjoy by the fire at home or in your ski condo.

Boulder Beer Company calls its Never Summer Ale “assertively hopped” which sounds scary, but isn’t if you like beers with a ruby-red hue. Beloved by Boulderites as an après-ski standard, the ale was a gold-medal winner in the 2004 World Beer Cup.

New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins developed a cult-like following for its 2° Below Winter Ale from inception. It’s one of the brewery’s most beloved small batches, delivering a slightly hoppy beer with some pepper and spice that pair perfectly with Monterey Jack cheese, dark meats and desserts featuring pears or apples.

Once brewed only in small batches for employees of Coors, AC Golden Brewing Company’s (a subsidiary of MillerCoors in Golden) crisp Winterfest lager has gained a faithful following since they started brewing slightly larger batches. One of the most fun things about this one is its exclusivity — you can only get it in Colorado.

Though the Northstar Imperial Porter brewed each winter by Boulder’s Twisted Pine Brewing Company is extremely enjoyable at the time of purchase, it’s also brewed to last. Connoisseurs can stow a six pack away in a cool, dark spot to savor its deliciously aged, full-bodied malted flavors a few winters from now.

Great Divide Brewing Company’s richly malted Hibernation Ale should be sipped cautiously — with 8.7 percent alcohol by volume, it’s one of the strongest winter selections. What really takes center stage, however, are the ale’s chocolate and dark fruit flavors. Visit their Denver tap room’s monthly beer-and-cheese pairing to find out what goes best with this winter favorite.

Other Colorado Craft Brews to Try

Estes Park Brewery’s German-style High Altitude Alt
Kannah Creek Brewing Company
’s Rudolph’s Revenge malty red ale (Grand Junction)
Breckenridge Brewery
’s hearty chocolate and caramel Christmas Ale
Avery Brewing Company
’s hazelnutty Old Jubilation Ale (Boulder)
Odell Brewing Co.
’s subtly sweet Isolation Ale (Fort Collins)
Pagosa Brewing Company
’s chocolate-and-vanilla-tinged Pack-It-In Wassail Ale (Pagosa Springs)

Many of these breweries offer tours of their operations, a particularly festive way to get your taste on. For information on all of Colorado’s craft brewers, visit the Colorado Brewers Guild.

– See more at: http://www.colorado.com/articles/top-winter-beers-colorados-craft-breweries#sthash.gFGQKOZT.dpuf

The 5 Best Beers to Share for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving dinner calls for some class. Wine is the obvious choice, but if your apron is selvedge and your turkey is heirloom, your tipple should be similarly trad. And that means beer. Here are a few great beer suggestions to bring to your Thanksgiving celebration.

Logsdon Seizoen Bretta, 8.0%

This true-to-the-name farmhouse brewery makes one kind of beer: saison. And they make it well. Run by the mad, yeast-wrangling genius behind Wyeast, Logsdon isn’t afraid to play with untraditional fermentations. This particular brew is spiked with brettanomyces, a wild yeast that gives it an extra-dry kick and a boisterous boost of carbonation — my bottle gushed like something possessed; keep a towel handy. When the head dies down, you’ll taste hay, horses, and funk with a prickling, appetite-whetting finish. Start your meal here.

Deschutes Chasin’ Freshies, 7.2% 
Ring in the harvest with this fresh-hopped IPA, dosed with just-picked Amarillos straight from the Washington farm that first discovered the now-classic strain. But don’t  fear: this is no palate-wrecking, resinously bitter boozer like other big IPAs. The orange-blossomy hops are kept well in check, their citrussy oils turning more refreshing than overpowering, making the beer a great spritzy intermezzo.

North Coast Old Stock 2011 Reserve, 15.2%
Classically British, with rich Maris Otter barley and flowery Fuggle and Golding hops, this winter warmer is as close to port as beer can safely get, packed with  chewy, butter-toffee sweetness. Used to be, stock ales like this were brewed on a first son’s birth and not cracked until the heir turned 18. Strong enough to stand a year or more in the cellar, save a bottle for later — if you can.

Firestone Anniversary Ale XVII, 13.3%
Firestone is a barreled-beer specialist, its cellar masters keeping watch over some 1,500 casks at a newly-built satellite brewery focusing just on wood-aging. Their Anniversary releases put that archive to use. This year’s is a blend of seven of Firestone’s barrel-aged beers, including classics like Double DBA and some unexpected twists like a blonde barley wine with tropical El Dorado hops called Helldorado, all mixed by a team of local winemakers. It’s dark and rich and dizzying strong, nutty sweet and glazed with caramel. Have your rum cake, and drink it too.

The Bruery Oude Tart, 7.5%
A Flemish-style red ale, aged in wine barrels for a year and a half, Oude Tart is sweetly sour, like high-octane balsamic vinegar drizzled on cherries. It’s a perfect cleansing dessert when the gravy boat runs dry — a near-repentant tangy slap to smack the grease off your palate.

Read More http://www.gq.com/life/food/201311/the-5-best-large-format-beers-for-thanksgiving-dinner#ixzz2llwwAlTT

Colorado beer festival event calendar: Fall and winter

The madness that is  Week is in the rear-view mirror, and what better way to recover than to load up your calendar with more beer-soaked events around Colorado.

 

Chef N Brew
Thurs., Nov. 14
EXDO Event Center, 1399 35th St, Denver

The food and beer pairing event returns for a second year with 15 chefs and 15 brewers teaming up and attendees voting on their favorite combinations. The cramped quarters and long lines at last year’s venue, the Oriental Theater, drew complaints so the move is good news. See the participating chefs and brewers confirmed so far and get tickets here for $49 and $59.

Parade of Darks
Sat., Dec. 7, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Wynkoop Brewing, 1634 18th St, Denver, CO 80202

Liquid courage before the annual Parade of Lights downtown. The Wynkoop’s Fourth Annual Parade of Darks promises winter seasonal beers from more than 35 breweries. Benefits MetroCare Ring, the local hunger relief organization. Advance tickets are $35 and day-of-event tickets are $42, and all attendees receive a commemorative glass and unlimited sampling. Buy tickets and check out last year’s impressive pour list here.

Denver Beer Festivus
Sat., Dec. 14, 2 p.m.-6 p.m.
McNichols Building, 144 West Colfax Avenue, Denver

Here’s a way to drink beer from just about every single Denver brewery in one setting. The 2nd Denver Beer Festivus – borrowing the name of the faux “Seinfeld” holiday with feats of strength and airings of grievances – will feature at least 24 breweries from within our fair city limits. Nineteen breweries poured last year. Among the anticipated new arrivals: Factofum BrewhouseJagged Mountain Craft Brewery and Station 26 Brewing. Presented by Denver Off the Wagon and Imbibe Denver. Tickets are $40 and available here.

Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywine
Jan. 9-11, 2014
Vail Cascade Resort and Spa, Vail

The 14th annual installment of one of the state’s best beer festivals, featuring high-alcohol beers (7 percent is the minimum) and high altitude (8,150 feet). The main attraction is the Saturday afternoon tasting session featuring Colorado and national breweries, but the educational aspects make Big Beers different from a lot of fests. This year features seminars and workshops on saisons, cooking with beer, brewing with Brettanomyces and more. The bitter taste of the Broncos’ playoff loss to the Ravens lingers for those who attended last year’s event. Here is a link to the lineup and tickets sales for the commercial tasting and seminars. Tickets to the dinners and the special packages are sold out.

 

Pucker Up, America: Beers Are Going Sour

Do you think you can handle the sour side of beer? There’s a new kid on the craft brewing block, and it’s going to knock your salivary glands into action. Here is an awesome article we found on this new trend that we wanted to share.

It’s called “sour beer.” When you take a sip, it’s like biting into a Granny Smith apple that’s soaked in a French red wine: crisp, refreshing and a bit odd.

Sour beers are probably the oldest style of brew in the world, but they’re just starting to get popular in the States. They were all the buzz at this year’s Great American Beer Festival. And with hundreds of brewers now dabbling in sours, it’s easier than ever to find them at a local bar or grocery store.

Most sour beers have few or no hops. So they’re a good option to try if you don’t like bitter beers or you’re a wine lover who prefers a pinot noir to a Pilsner, says New Belgium‘s CEO, Kim Jordan of Fort Collins, Colo.

New Belgium, which produces the ubiquitous Fat Tire Ale, has started a whole series of sour beers called Lips of Faith — one of the most widely available lines of sour.

So what in the heck are these strange brews?

Sours beers are to the adult beverage world what yogurt is to dairy. Its beer that’s been intentionally spoiled by bacteria — the good bacteria.

“We use the same microbes that make yogurt, miso and salami,” says Alex Wallash, who co-founded The Rare Barrel, in Berkeley, Calif., one of the few breweries in the U.S. devoted solely to making sour beers.

Bacteria gobble up sugars in the beer and convert them into acids, like the ones in Granny Smith apples and lemons. The microcritters also churn out a smorgasbord of flavors and aromas. The result is a brew that has all the complexity of a wine and the zing of a Sour Patch Kid.

“Sour beers are tart like a raspberry or strawberry, but a lot of them are dry, like Champagne,” Wallash says. So their taste sits somewhere between an ale, wine and cider, he says. “It will definitely change your expectation about what a beer tastes like. It’s a new flavor experience all together.”

And one that you might not like right away.

“When I first tried a sour, I was shocked,” says Patrick Rue ofThe Bruery in Placentia, Calif. “I thought it had spoiled, and I threw the rest of the beer down the drain.”

But it was too late for Rue. He had been bitten by the sour bug and went on to make some of the first sour beers in Southern California, including the popular Tart of Darkness.

In traditional beer-making, yeast is added to boiled grains to ferment the sugars into alcohol. Then the brew is ready for bottling.

But for sour beers, the process doesn’t stop there. Brewers also add the bacteria Lactobacillus and Pediococcus. Sometimes they’ll include a dash of Brettanomyces, a type of wild yeast that makes cherry, mango and pineapple flavors as well as an earthy aroma that some call funky, horsey or leathery

The alternative approach for brewing sours is to go old-school and just let all the wild yeast and bacteria in the air drop into the beer naturally. It’s risky but — when done right — can produce magnificent beer.

That’s the strategy Ron Jeffries atJolly Pumpkin in Dexter, Mich., uses. He’s a pioneer of the sour movement in America, and he made some of the first commercial sours way back in 2004.

“There’s wild yeast and bacteria everywhere, especially if there are orchards nearby,” Jeffries tells The Salt. “When you make a happy home for them in your barrels, they just show up and spontaneously ferment — and sour — a beer.”

“For thousands of years, all beer had sour notes to it,” Jeffries says. “It was refreshing and crisp because people didn’t understand how to keep things clean.

“Then with pasteurization, refrigeration and an understanding of how to keep cultures free of bacteria, beers started to become nonsour,” he says.

A handful of breweries in Belgium continued to produce sour beers, known as lambics, Flanders ales and guezes. But it’s craft breweries in America that are making them fashionable again.

“They’re taking the beer style in crazy directions, just like they did with IPAs and porters,” Jeffries says. “The reason why you’re seeing sour beers gaining popularity is because they taste great, but also because of the creativity of American brewers.”

(Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/10/15/234914933/pucker-up-america-beers-are-going-sour)

Hopstories

Every bottle of craft beer you take off the shelf has a story. It’s written by individuals with the passion to start a brewery and the dedication to master the craft. We share their story, and the stories behind your favorite brews, in Hopstories.

Here’s a craft beer video documentary series I think you folks might like:

 

Why Are IPAs so Popular?

Four Reasons Why IPAs Are so Popular

  1. They taste good.
  2. They’re “advanced.”
  3. They have lots of flavor.
  4. Science!

IPAs Taste Good

It is important that Conley has separate entries for taste and flavor. It might interest you to know that they are not quite the same thing. Along with sight, smell, touch and hearing, taste is one of our five senses. Our taste buds recognize sweet, salty, sour, umami and bitter.

Bitter is certainly a major factor when tasting an IPA, as the style employs an increased amount of hops which can add what is often described as evident, bracing and even aggressive bitterness. Since everyone has slightly different tastes, what may be evident bitterness to one craft beer drinker may be bracing to another.

IPAs Are “Advanced”

While bitterness of an IPA has a lot to do with a person’s individual perception, we also know that tastes can change over time. You may not have enjoyed the first highly-hopped IPA you tried, but over time, perhaps you grew to really enjoy a bracingly bitter IPA—or not, that’s ok too!

Human taste is pre-wired from the time we’re born. For example, innately we like the taste of sweet things as children, but perhaps do not take to sour or bitter flavors right away. But as we grow up and try new things, our brain figures out that not all sour and bitter flavors are bad, such is the case with IPAs.

Experts believe that our sense of taste helped ancient humans choose what types of things were good to eat. To the human mind, a sweet taste translates to calories and energy, which is good for a hungry little hunter-gatherer. However, sour tastes may mean that the food has become rancid or is potentially poisonous.

IPA beer quote

Bitterness in beer is not bad, and actually often provides a refreshing balance. Wouldn’t beer be boring if it was just sugary sweet? So perhaps enjoying an IPA does signify a state of advanced beer appreciation. Being able to sense not just the bitterness of an IPA, but the more nuanced contributions hops add to a beer, such as aroma and flavor happens over time.

In a nut shell, beer drinkers are not pre-wired to like IPAs, you learn to like them, so in a weird way it can be a craft beer badge of honor to order one.

IPAs Have Lots of Flavor

While taste is one of our five senses, flavor is considered a synthetic sense, where a mix of stimuli come together and our brain works to recognize, record and recount a certain flavor. Taste plays a role in flavor, but all of the other senses work in cooperation to create flavor too.

When you drink an IPA, you experience a lot of different components, but your taste buds can really only tell you if what you are experiencing is sweet, bitter, sour, salty or umami. In this case, there might be some sweet and bitter, but when the taste of an IPA is paired with the aroma and golden color, you sense flavors like grapefruit, pine, roses, etc.

Science!

Each drinker’s personal taste is as unique as the fingerprints on their condensation-covered glass—it’s totally subjective. What one may like about the flavor of an IPA may be different from what another may or may not like about the style. I love IPAs, but do I love every IPA I try, not necessarily. Science is certainly a major player in the IPA discussion, from hop variety development, all the way to personal flavor perception.

Appropriately, Conley finishes with the obvious answer of, “They’re popular because damn, they’re tasty.” Does that mean that all examples of the style are tasty to everyone—no. Each of us has a unique set of tastes, both inherited and learned. Some will never like the bitterness of an IPA, and some will decide they do. Luckily, there are plenty of IPAs out there to test and train your taste buds.

 

Big Franchise Taps Into Marketing Opportunity with Craft Beer

Better Burger, Better Brew

Smashburger’s beer pairings continue to differentiate the brand.

Smashburger cofounder explains craft beer and burger pairing at Chicago event.
Smashburger cofounder Tom Ryan explains a craft beer and burger pairing at a recent Chicago event. Daniel P. Smith.
Inside Smashburger’s newest Chicago-area restaurant, a hip-looking joint in the city’s trendy Lincoln Park neighborhood, company founder and chief concept officer Tom Ryan holds up the brand’s Windy City Burger as if it’s Lord Stanley’s Cup.

Packed with layers of melted Cheddar cheese, haystack onions, lettuce, tomato, and spicy mustard on a pretzel bun, the Windy City Burger is the fast-casual chain’s exclusive offering for the Chicago market and continues Smashburger’s six-year run of creating local burgers across its 209-store national footprint.

“This burger,” Ryan says, “represents the heartiness and boldness that is Chicago.”

In quick time, Ryan turns the floor over to his company’s newest partners from Chicago-based Goose Island, among the nation’s most celebrated breweries. Goose Island’s brewmaster, Brett Porter, and head of education, Suzanne Wolcott, detail how the toasty, caramel malt flavors in Goose Island’s Honker’s Ale complement the Windy City Burger.

The June 20 beer-and-burger pairing launched Smashburger’s 10th relationship with a craft brewer and helped spotlight craft brews’ continued emergence in the limited-service world.

Once reserved for bars and full-service restaurants, craft beers have pushed into fast-casual eateries around the country, available at spots such as Chipotle, Noodles & Company, and Shake Shack. For most craft brewers, growing entry into the quick-service world is a welcome trend that provides expanded market reach and diversification.

“Craft beer is a 30-year-old overnight success story, and there’s no turning back. Localization of the beer market is in every nook of the U.S.,” says Julia Herz, craft beer program director for the Brewers Association.

“By tapping into craft brewing, one of the most energetic and innovative industries out there, we’re able to offer our guests something that is special, high quality, and distinctive.”

According to the Brewers Association, the craft category, which the Association defines as “small and independent” (wording that excludes the Anheuser-Busch InBev–owned Goose Island enterprise), captured 15 percent volume growth and 17 percent dollar growth in 2012. Craft brewing’s total sales share in 2012 was 6.5 percent by volume and 10.2 percent by dollars.

“This tells us there’s a growing segment of customers looking for craft beer and they’ll go where they can to get it and spend more at the places that offer it,” Herz says.

That surging momentum has motivated and inspired quick-service folks like Ryan to bring craft beer into the fold.

Over the last two years, Denver-based Smashburger has created local burger and craft-brew pairings in markets throughout the U.S., including partnerships with Summit Brewing in Minnesota’s Twin Cities, Christian Moerlein in Cincinnati, Sixpoint in New York City, New Belgium in Denver, and Deep Ellum in Dallas. Ryan teases future pairings in Las Vegas, San Francisco, and Sacramento, California.

“The idea is that once we have enough stores in a given market, we’ll pursue these partnerships and write the next chapter of our localization,” Ryan says. “We want to cater to local tastes as part of our brand mantra, and local craft beer is something people are gravitating toward.”

The partnerships, Ryan says, are also an effort to differentiate Smashburger in the ultra-competitive better-burger space. Same goes for the pairing suggestions from beverage and culinary experts, which are listed on the menuboard.

“I believe differentiation is the key to success in a highly competitive marketplace,” he says. “By tapping into craft brewing, one of the most energetic and innovative industries out there, we’re able to offer our guests something that is special, high quality, and distinctive.”

Though beer represents less than 4 percent of Smashburger’s total sales, Ryan expects the continued allure of craft beer to elevate that number. In fact, beer sales have jumped 20–50 percent in markets where Smashburger has introduced its craft-beer pairings.

Smashburger, which now has 11 Chicago-area stores, approached Goose Island about a potential partnership in mid-2012. Wolcott says Goose Island leadership appreciated Smashburger’s work to localize its menu and store environments, as well as the chain’s focus on quality.

“We’re a Chicago craft brewer that doesn’t take shortcuts, so we embraced what Smashburger was trying to do because it very much matches our work,” Wolcott says.

Over the course of nearly one year, Ryan, Porter, and Wolcott held numerous tastings to define which of Goose Island’s nearly 20 beers best complemented Smashburger’s signature entrées.

“The only challenge is to do this from an authentic perspective and commit the time to creating the pairings and rolling this out,” Ryan says. “Once in the restaurant, bottled beer isn’t hard to do.”

Ryan says the simultaneous innovation that has occurred in the burger and beer worlds affords his brand the opportunity to evolve America’s favorite food—the burger—and its favorite adult beverage for the next generation.

“With relationships like these, we can show people that burgers and beer are different than they used to be,” Ryan says.

A Glorious Map Of Craft Beer Across The U.S.

Infographic of the Day as Seen on FastCoDesign.com

Selected as the Infographic of the Day on Fast Company’s web site, this wonderfully created info graphic shows how craft beer has continued to flourish state-by-state. Enjoy this visual map of breweries, consumers and growth across our beer-boasting country.

[button link=”http://craftbrew.cirqlemedia.com/the-invasion-of-craft-breweries-in-the-u-s/” color=”orange”] The Invasion of Craft Breweries in the U.S. – Interactive Map[/button]

Which state makes the most craft beer? California. But that’s only part of the story. Lagunitas makes more than one amazing beer, as does Stone Brewing Co. Today, both of these once-tiny California breweries have blossomed into household names that you can spot on almost any decent tap. But they’re only two of the 316 craft breweries found in the monster state of California, which can boast almost double the craft breweries of the next mightiest beer state, Washington.

It’s one of many factoids you’ll pick up in The New Yorker’s interactive infographic that we have included here Mapping the Rise of Craft Beer. It employs a relatively simple interface–a few toggles and mouseovers–to convey an incredible amount of information, a brown, tan, and yellow state of the union of frothy fuzzyheadedness.

The new craft breweries in 2012.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “I guess I’ve gotta move to California now.” Untrue! A more studied approach to consumption would be to weigh not just how many breweries are in a given state, but how many breweries are in a given state per person. In this regard, Vermont takes the crown. They may only have 25 craft breweries across the state, but with a population of only 626,201 people, that’s the best ratio of man to brewery in the U.S. Or if all-around performance is more your speed, Oregon should probably be your pick. It ranks fourth in variety, fifth in production, and second in breweries per capita.

It’s all enough to make a man wary of the sustainability of the craft beer movement. That is, until he cracks another cold one in the name of supporting the underdog.

[button link=”http://craftbrew.cirqlemedia.com/the-invasion-of-craft-breweries-in-the-u-s/” color=”orange”] The Invasion of Craft Breweries in the U.S. – Interactive Map[/button]