Brewing an Effective Craft Beer Label

Whether you’re brewing beer as a hobby or business, you have to take into account what your drinkers see on the bottle as they sample your beer. Craft beer calls for a label design which is unique and stylish.

Instead of just slapping the word “light” on the beer bottle, think of a creative approach on how to introduce it to the beer drinking community. Mind you, these labels have a big influence on the perceived quality of your beer. Thus, explaining the need for breweries to create a distinct brand identity.

Understanding the history of craft beer

By learning how microbreweries have evolved, you can fully appreciate the craft beer industry and the people who have managed to make it thrive up to this day. It could also help you spark some ideas for creative direction like how you want the beer drinking community to remember your beer and your company.

Be remarkable to set yourself apart

One sure way of failing in this industry is by being boring. You have to be remarkable in order to be successful.

Craft beer consumers are receptive of designs that are different from the norms. Also, they choose their favorite beer according to its brand, not the beer process or brewing style.

Pay attention to details

If your beer isn’t seasonal, you can add in a bit of creativity by replacing the usual label with a holiday version. This simple move could help boost sales. Also, don’t forget to incorporate the beer’s distinguishing style into the new packaging.

The cap should also be part of your beer branding so don’t forget to include it in the conceptualization stage.

Make your design specific, brief and clear

When conceptualizing your beer label design, you have to tell the designer exactly what you’re looking to achieve. Here, it is important to provide details about your history, beer style, brewery location and your target audience.

You can also provide samples of label styles, color swatches and fonts that you like to give inspiration to the designer.

The Basics of Home Brewing

 

If you are a beer lover, you may have considered brewing beer at the comfort of your home. It’s not only economical; it’s also a great hobby that you could share with your friends. And by the end of your project, you’ll be welcomed with a cold glass of your very own beer.

Purchase a starter kit

As you begin to explore the art of brewing beer, getting a starting kit would be your best option. This kit contains all the supplies and equipments which are needed for home brewing, plus, detailed instructions also come with the package. This is especially recommended for beginners as you’ll be provided with everything you need for this project.

Prepare the ingredients

Surprisingly, beer involves a simple process. It’s basically just water with malt.

Most of the time, the ingredients needed in brewing are included in the home brew starter kit. As you master the art of brewing beer, you can start experimenting and add in hops, grains and malts. These could provide an added flavor to your beer.

Brewing the beer

Brewing beer is easy, especially if you’re using a starter kit. Follow these steps and start brewing your own beer.

Brewing – This process takes about 2 hours.

Start off by cleaning and sterilizing your equipments. Dissolve the brew in 2 to 4 liters of hot water then add in 1 Kg of dextrose or sugar. Then, put 10 liters of cold water in the fermenter, add the hot mixture and mix it well.

Top it up to 23 liters. When the temperature reaches below 30°, sprinkle it with brewer’s yeast.

Fermenting – This process takes about a week

This is where the magic happens! After adding the yeast, you can now seal the fermenter. Remember to partially fill the airlock with boiled, cooled water.

Allow the brew to ferment for a week, letting it stay at about 20 to 22°. Once you notice that the brew clears and the airlock stops bubbling, set aside for 48 hours. After this, you beer is ready for bottling.

Bottling

Make sure to sterilize all the caps and bottles. Add 1 tablespoon of sugar to each bottle. Fill the bottles, leaving 40mm from the top.

Cover the bottles and tilt each bottle for a few times in order to dissolve the sugar. Keep them in a warm place for about 5 days, then transfer them to a cooler place and let it stay for another 5 days. Leave it alone for another week. After this, you are free to enjoy your very own beer.

Marketing your Beer Event through Social Media

If you’re planning a beer event, social media could be an efficient and cost-effective way of creating buzz, filling seats and turning your one-time gathering into a recurring event.

In order to successfully promote your event, you should know which type of social media tools to use and when you should use them. Listed below are a few tips that could help you organize a successful event.

Before the event

The first step is to let people know about your event and make sure they mark it on their calendars. You can do this through Twitter.

Raise awareness twitter

A lot of business owners have their own hashtags for their events. While there’s no secret formula in creating one, just try to incorporate a hashtag in all your tweets and encourage others to do the same when tweeting about your event.

In order to encourage people to use the hashtag, you can sweeten the deal by giving out a free pass to one of the lucky followers.

During the event

Just because the event has already started, doesn’t mean that your marketing efforts have to end there. Since most beer events are held at night, you can keep the foot traffic high and the excitement up by continuously updating your followers through social media all night.

Foursquare or Gowalla

Creating an event in Foursquare or Gowalla is free. By creating one, attendees would be encouraged to check in on your event and share them via social media.

Since a lot of people link their Gowalla and Foursquare activity to their Facebook and Twitter accounts, check-ins would be seen by their friends; thus, encouraging their friends to come to your event.

After the event

Blog about it

Create a blog post on how the event went and how you plan to make the next even more exciting. Also, feel free to ask for feedbacks and suggestions from the attendees. This way, you’ll have a better idea on what to do next time.

You can also post a status on your Facebook page about the event and encourage your followers to leave a comment as well.

There are still a lot of ways to promote your event via social media. You just have to be a bit creative in order to attract the attention of people.

Top Winter Beers at Colorado’s Craft Breweries

One of the most glorious and distinct harbingers of winter in Colorado is the appearance of seasonal beers. Winter is the time to take advantage of flavors such as roasted malts, chocolate, pepper spice and caramel. Below are a few winter warmers from Colorado craft breweries to keep an eye out for, according to Colorado.com.

Left Hand Brewery in Longmont boasts two winter brews. Fade to Black, which was the 2010 Great American Beer Festival’s Gold Medal-winner (foreign stout category), has rich notes of licorice, espresso bean and molasses. Good Juju, the reincarnation of the former year-round offering Juju Ginger, is a bit lighter but has the seasonal spiciness that only comes from brewing with pungent ginger.

It’s said that the San Juan Mountain snowpack is responsible for the quality and freshness of the Winter Ale from Durango Brewing Co. Those who live in this southwestern town demand great après-ski beers, and this ale, with a lightly fruity taste and cocoa finish delivers. Plus, it’s available by the growler from the Main Ave. Tap Room, making it easy to enjoy by the fire at home or in your ski condo.

Boulder Beer Company calls its Never Summer Ale “assertively hopped” which sounds scary, but isn’t if you like beers with a ruby-red hue. Beloved by Boulderites as an après-ski standard, the ale was a gold-medal winner in the 2004 World Beer Cup.

New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins developed a cult-like following for its 2° Below Winter Ale from inception. It’s one of the brewery’s most beloved small batches, delivering a slightly hoppy beer with some pepper and spice that pair perfectly with Monterey Jack cheese, dark meats and desserts featuring pears or apples.

Once brewed only in small batches for employees of Coors, AC Golden Brewing Company’s (a subsidiary of MillerCoors in Golden) crisp Winterfest lager has gained a faithful following since they started brewing slightly larger batches. One of the most fun things about this one is its exclusivity — you can only get it in Colorado.

Though the Northstar Imperial Porter brewed each winter by Boulder’s Twisted Pine Brewing Company is extremely enjoyable at the time of purchase, it’s also brewed to last. Connoisseurs can stow a six pack away in a cool, dark spot to savor its deliciously aged, full-bodied malted flavors a few winters from now.

Great Divide Brewing Company’s richly malted Hibernation Ale should be sipped cautiously — with 8.7 percent alcohol by volume, it’s one of the strongest winter selections. What really takes center stage, however, are the ale’s chocolate and dark fruit flavors. Visit their Denver tap room’s monthly beer-and-cheese pairing to find out what goes best with this winter favorite.

Other Colorado Craft Brews to Try

Estes Park Brewery’s German-style High Altitude Alt
Kannah Creek Brewing Company
’s Rudolph’s Revenge malty red ale (Grand Junction)
Breckenridge Brewery
’s hearty chocolate and caramel Christmas Ale
Avery Brewing Company
’s hazelnutty Old Jubilation Ale (Boulder)
Odell Brewing Co.
’s subtly sweet Isolation Ale (Fort Collins)
Pagosa Brewing Company
’s chocolate-and-vanilla-tinged Pack-It-In Wassail Ale (Pagosa Springs)

Many of these breweries offer tours of their operations, a particularly festive way to get your taste on. For information on all of Colorado’s craft brewers, visit the Colorado Brewers Guild.

– See more at: http://www.colorado.com/articles/top-winter-beers-colorados-craft-breweries#sthash.gFGQKOZT.dpuf

The 5 Best Beers to Share for Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving dinner calls for some class. Wine is the obvious choice, but if your apron is selvedge and your turkey is heirloom, your tipple should be similarly trad. And that means beer. Here are a few great beer suggestions to bring to your Thanksgiving celebration.

Logsdon Seizoen Bretta, 8.0%

This true-to-the-name farmhouse brewery makes one kind of beer: saison. And they make it well. Run by the mad, yeast-wrangling genius behind Wyeast, Logsdon isn’t afraid to play with untraditional fermentations. This particular brew is spiked with brettanomyces, a wild yeast that gives it an extra-dry kick and a boisterous boost of carbonation — my bottle gushed like something possessed; keep a towel handy. When the head dies down, you’ll taste hay, horses, and funk with a prickling, appetite-whetting finish. Start your meal here.

Deschutes Chasin’ Freshies, 7.2% 
Ring in the harvest with this fresh-hopped IPA, dosed with just-picked Amarillos straight from the Washington farm that first discovered the now-classic strain. But don’t  fear: this is no palate-wrecking, resinously bitter boozer like other big IPAs. The orange-blossomy hops are kept well in check, their citrussy oils turning more refreshing than overpowering, making the beer a great spritzy intermezzo.

North Coast Old Stock 2011 Reserve, 15.2%
Classically British, with rich Maris Otter barley and flowery Fuggle and Golding hops, this winter warmer is as close to port as beer can safely get, packed with  chewy, butter-toffee sweetness. Used to be, stock ales like this were brewed on a first son’s birth and not cracked until the heir turned 18. Strong enough to stand a year or more in the cellar, save a bottle for later — if you can.

Firestone Anniversary Ale XVII, 13.3%
Firestone is a barreled-beer specialist, its cellar masters keeping watch over some 1,500 casks at a newly-built satellite brewery focusing just on wood-aging. Their Anniversary releases put that archive to use. This year’s is a blend of seven of Firestone’s barrel-aged beers, including classics like Double DBA and some unexpected twists like a blonde barley wine with tropical El Dorado hops called Helldorado, all mixed by a team of local winemakers. It’s dark and rich and dizzying strong, nutty sweet and glazed with caramel. Have your rum cake, and drink it too.

The Bruery Oude Tart, 7.5%
A Flemish-style red ale, aged in wine barrels for a year and a half, Oude Tart is sweetly sour, like high-octane balsamic vinegar drizzled on cherries. It’s a perfect cleansing dessert when the gravy boat runs dry — a near-repentant tangy slap to smack the grease off your palate.

Read More http://www.gq.com/life/food/201311/the-5-best-large-format-beers-for-thanksgiving-dinner#ixzz2llwwAlTT

5 Clues to Deciphering Craft Beer Styles

Understanding what a beer might taste like from its name alone can be a little daunting. Despite the craft beer community’s welcoming nature, it is easy to see why newcomers might feel lost when looking at a beer menu. Wheat, weizen and wit—each are different styles with specific histories and characteristics, but all are fairly similar in composition. It can be confusing!

While some beer styles require a bit of background to understand, one can often make reasonable assumptions about a beer’s character with a small amount of information. Here is a list of five clues that will help you quickly decipher what a beer might taste like before ordering that we wanted to share!

1. Origin/Region

A beer style’s country or region of origin goes a long way in providing clues to what the beer might taste like. The classic beer styles were developed over hundreds of years and were greatly impacted by regional and environmental variables like geography, climate and water chemistry.

Is it impossible to make a German lager outside of Germany? Of course not! As world travel became easier and the science of brewing was better understood, brewers began to mimic water qualities of specific regions and wrangle yeast cells to attain beer qualities once unique to certain ares of the world. Today, many American craft brewers have become skilled at brewing lagers similar to those originally crafted in Bavaria, hoppy IPAs reminiscent of the Burton-on-Trent region (Staffordshire, UK), roasty stouts indicative of Dublin, Ireland, and even the mysteriously tart and complex beers of Flanders, Belgium.

Of course there are exceptions to every rule, but these geographic-centric terms found in beer style names can offer clues about a beer’s character.

Origin Clues

  • German-style | lager with complex malt character and floral hops
  • Belgian-style | fruity, spicy ales or sour beers
  • English-style | pale ales, porters and stouts with earthy hop character
  • American-style | hop-forward beers with flavors of pine, citrus and resin
  • Belgo-American | fruity and spicy Belgian yeast flavor with American-style hop character

2. Color

You eat with your eyes, right? Well, you drink with them too. Colors play a factor in beer appreciation and have become popular for naming derivatives of classic styles (e.g., black IPA, white IPA). Classic beer styles include a fair number of beers named after their color, and you can often make a good guess of a beer’s malt flavor just by knowing its name and seeing it in a glass.

Color Clues

  • Light/Pale | Flavors: grainy, bread-like | Styles: blonde ale, helles, Belgian-style wit
  • Amber | Flavors: toasty, bread crust | Styles: amber ale, amber lager
  • Brown | Flavors: toast, roasted nuts, chocolate | Styles: brown ale, Marzen, dopplebock
  • Black | Flavors: burnt toast, dark chocolate, coffee, espresso | Styles: dry stout, robust porter, American black ale

3. Special Ingredients

There is no better clue when anticipating what a beer may taste like than having one or more of the star ingredients in the name. Some of these ingredients are so popular that they have become recognized with their own style categories. Special ingredients range in intensity, but there is usually an expectation that the brewer will aim to strike a balance, ensuring that the base style still prevails while the added notes sing.

Common Special Ingredients

  • Chocolate
  • Coffee
  • Fruit | raspberries, strawberries, peaches, cherries, etc.
  • Herb and Spices | cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, heather, etc.

4. Yeast

The type of yeast used in a style has a great impact on the final beer. The standard explanation is that beer is divided into two categories: ales and lagers. Of course, like with most things, a gray area exists. Today’s brewers are using nontraditional yeasts, blending different types of yeast and using traditional yeast in untraditional ways. It’s not quite as cut and dry as ale and lager, but some generalities do exist.

Ales

Ales ferment at warmer temperatures; because of this, they often present more yeast-derived flavors (fruity, sometimes spicy). Usually when you see the term ale, you can anticipate that yeast flavors provide some, if not much, of the flavor you will experience. When you enjoy a Belgian-style dubbel, you tend to taste a lot of fruit. Fruit flavors don’t necessarily mean that there is fruit in the beer, but rather that the yeast used has provided those flavors. We call fruity yeast flavors esters. A common example of esters is seen in German weizens, in the flavor perceived as banana.

Lagers

Lagers ferment at cooler temperatures and create a much “cleaner” beer, allowing you to taste the malt and hops more explicitly. As a test, try tasting an amber ale and amber lager side by side. Both will have generally the same ingredients, but the flavors will differ because of the yeast that was used.

5. Vessel/ Vintage/ Volume

Vessel

Beer that has been aged can pick up the flavors of the vessel it has spent time in. Barrels, are one of the most common aging vessels. If a barrel has never been used, the beer can present flavors of the wood itself, usually oak. Oak flavors can be spicy, woody or even vanilla-like, depending on how the barrel was prepared. If the barrel had been previously used for another beverage (wine or spirits), there may be some residual flavors from those present as well. So if you don’t like the taste of bourbon, beware of a bourbon barrel-aged beer.

Vintage

A vintage denotes the year a beer was produced. While in most cases beer should be enjoyed fresh, there are certain styles that can develop positively when aged. If you see that a beer has a vintage, you can assume it has a relatively high ABV, as alcohol has preservative qualities. Additionally, you might expect the flavors to be more complex when compared to a fresh example of the same beer.

Volume: “These go to 11.”

Volume usually denotes either flavor or strength. Words like “strong,” “sour” and “session” act as clues to what you might experience. These clues, when coupled with your basic understanding of the base style, should allow you to make a solid guess about the beer.

  • Strong ale | an ale of significant alcoholic strength
  • Sweet stout | very dark, sweet, full-bodied, slightly roasty ale
  • Robust porter | substantial, malty dark ale with a complex and flavorful roasty character
  • Session IPA | characteristics of a traditional IPA, but with less alcoholic strength
  • Imperial stout | a stronger version of the original stout style

The Big Picture

Even in the best beer establishments, there won’t always be someone to answer questions about a draught list. Learning the basics about a few of the more common beer styles will go a long way in helping you order something you’ll enjoy!

http://www.craftbeer.com/craft-beer-muses/5-clues-to-deciphering-craft-beer-styles

12 Ways to Market Your Beer Event with Social Media

12 Ways to Market Your Event With Social Media

Whether you’re planning a real-world event (like a “largely publicized craft beer event”) or a local event (like a “street fair or in-the-park beer social”), social media can be an inexpensive, cost-effective way to build buzz, fill seats, and turn a one-off gathering into a recurring event.

The trick is to know which social media tools to use and when to use them.  This article contains 12 useful social media tips designed to help your events shine.

Before Your Event

The first step is to make people aware of your event, to mark it on their calendar, and to

register. Here’s the game plan:

#1: Market Your Event Through Twitter

There are many ways in which you can use Twitter to raise awareness. Many conferences and events have their own hashtags, such as #smss10 or #metweetup. There’s no magic to creating one—just start using a hashtag in all your related tweets and encourage other people to do the same when talking about your event.

To encourage people to tweet out your hashtag and spread the word, sweeten the deal with a free pass, door prize or other giveaway for one lucky hashtag-er.

If your event is large enough, give it its own Twitter account such as @Blogworld or @socialmediaFTW, which serves as a customer service “hotline”and adds credibility to the event.

Mix up your event tweets by varying the message.

Mix up your beer event tweets by varying the message.

Constantly tweeting that your event is coming will annoy some of your followers, so mix it up: use tweets to announce new sponsors, special guests, an open bar, secret after-party, or to ask questions that might help shape the event.

Finally, ask for people to share your event with the simple phrase, “Please RT!” You’ll be amazed at the results. Just don’t overdo it; you don’t want to look desperate, do you?

#2: Market Your Event Through Facebook

Certainly you can update your status with news of your event, but don’t overlook Facebook events, which Facebook guru Mari Smith calls “one of the most powerful tools on the platform.”

A page for your event attracts fans.

I’ve found success by first creating a page for the event, and then creating a “Facebook Event” from that. This is especially helpful if you have a recurring event, such as an annual conference or a tweetup, as it helps build a fan base over time.

A page for your event attracts fans.

Other benefits of creating a Facebook page include:

  • You can add a “Like Box” to your website, blog or other web presence to promote your clambake.
  • You can invite fans as well as friends to the March on Washington.
  • You can take out targeted Facebook ads to reach people outside your network who would be interested in your Save the Whales Sit-In.

#3: Market Your Event Through LinkedIn

Promote business functions with LinkedIn Events to reach your professional network. As Lewis Howes points out in his excellent post, Top 5 Ways to Market Your Business with LinkedIn, “once someone RSVPs to your event, it shows up on the home profile of everyone that person is connected to, spreading the message for you.”

It’s simple and straightforward to create an event on LinkedIn. Once you’ve completed that task, it’s just as easy to invite up to 50 people from your LinkedIn network. It also shows up in the events search.

#4: Market Your Event Through Your Blog

Whether through an existing blog or a blog created specifically for your gathering, be sure to create posts announcing the event, calls for presenters, and sponsorship opportunities. Follow up with guest posts from presenters who should welcome the opportunity to reach a wider audience (and steal people who might have attended competing events!).

#5: Other Places to Market Online

There are plenty of online calendars, and you should list your event in any that seem appropriate.

Local papers, TV channels and radio stations’ websites often host a calendar of events that offer free postings. Tweetvite is a site for promoting and learning about tweetups, and Eventful is one of many sites where you can list all types of gatherings.

#6: Event Marketing and Registration Tools

There’s no need to reinvent the wheel when handling online registration for your event. Constant Contact is a highly popular tool for the social media crowd sourcing and email reach and registration.

With these tools you can create and market your event, and even collect payments with registration. Registration forms appear on the event marketing company’s site and can be embedded into your website or blog.

Sharing tools let attendees post to Facebook and Twitter, which builds buzz and generates more registrations.

During Your Event

Just because your event has started doesn’t mean the marketing has ended! If you’re promoting an all-day affair of beer nirvana in the park, people will be milling in and out all day. Keep the excitement and foot traffic high by leveraging social media well into the night.

#7: Foursquare and Gowalla

Events on Foursquare will encourage attendees to share.

It costs nothing to create an event in Foursquare or Gowalla, and attendees who are hip to location-based apps will want to check in to your event for the extra points!

Since many people link their Foursquare and Gowalla activity to Twitter and Facebook, check-ins reach well beyond early adopters of location-based apps.

Events on Foursquare will encourage attendees to share.

You can greatly increase the number of check-ins by adding signs and table-top displays reminding people to check in, and even sweeten the deal with a giveaway or random drawing.

#8: Use Those Hashtags!

Hashtags make your event more findable, searchable and memorable.

People will tweet out memorable lines from your event, so make sure everyone knows the Twitter hashtag: put it in your literature, on name tags, and announce it during your keynote.

Hashtags make your event more findable, searchable and memorable.

#9: Live Blogging

If you’re putting on a conference, it might be worthwhile to have someone “live blog” the sessions. Instead of just taking notes, have them take notes straight into a blog post and publish it as soon as the session ends.

#10: A Picture Says a Thousand Words

Although Twitpics and iPhone photos are great and shareable, hire a photographer for the day. If you can’t afford one, consider an in-kind trade of a free pass. Make sure you come to an agreement on who owns the photos and how they can be used online to promote this and future events.

#11: Thoughts on Video

There are so many ways to use video at your event: quick interviews with attendees and speakers on Flip cams, recorded sessions, or live streaming the event with UStream.tv.

#12: After Your Event

After the glow of a successful comic book convention, bean supper or Tri for a Cure fades, it’s time to get back to work.

Create a blog post of your reflections on how the event went, what you learned, and even how the next one could rock even harder.  Ask for feedback and suggestions in the comments field. Post something similar to your Facebook page and encourage fans and friends to leave comments there as well.

Upload your photos to Flickr and other photo sharing sites and be sure to give them appropriate titles, descriptions and tags. Use the Creative Commons license to let them be shared as far and wide as possible.

After you’ve finished uploading your photos to Facebook be sure to tag everyone you know and ask them to “fill in the blanks” by tagging anyone else. This can have a viral effect as people love seeing photos of themselves and their friends, driving them all back to your Facebook page.

Post video to YouTube, Facebook and other video sharing sites. Ask your presenters to share their slides on Slideshare, again with appropriate tags, titles and links.

Wrapping Up

Undoubtedly, there are more sites and techniques to promote your event through social media. What platforms do you use, what techniques have proven especially effective, and how did you generate excitement and fill the seats at your last event?

Cirqle Media and Brewing-A-Brand have tools and support that can take your event to a new level.  If you have a beer event in the works or a 2nd annual that needs more lift – send us a note and will provide some ideas and marketing support that will get your vendors, sponsors and attendees talking about your event for years to come.

Contributing Writer Rich Brooks and Our Marketing Team

Celebrate American Craft Beer Week from Coast to Coast

In support of Craft Breweries from coast to coast, Cirqle Media and Brewing-A-Brand would like to encourage all our craft beer fans to get out and celebrate their love for our nations’ best hops, barley and wheat.  From May 13-19, craft beer connoisseurs and beginners alike will come together for the eighth annual celebration of American Craft Beer Week (ACBW). With the tagline “Big Week, Small Breweries,” ACBW is an opportunity to toast the more than 2,400 small and independent American craft brewers who continue to make the U.S. the world’s most diverse brewing destination. Once again, ACBW celebrations are expected to be held across all 50 states.

“The popularity of American Craft Beer Week is indicative of the craft beer renaissance that continues to captivate the U.S.,” said Julia Herz, publisher of CraftBeer.com and craft beer program director at the Brewers Association. “This week is about uniting for a common cause: support and celebration of our nation’s small and independent brewers and the millions of beer lovers who have helped evolve an industry and put the U.S. on the brewing map.”

New for 2013 is the American Craft Beer Week Coast to Coast Toast. For the first time ever, ACBW will be commemorated by a simultaneous toast. At 8:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. PT on Thursday, May 16, small brewers and craft beer lovers nationwide will raise a glass of their favorite craft brewed beer to toast ACBW and the delicious beer that it celebrates. To find a toast location near you, visit the official American Craft Beer Week events page, hosted by CraftBeer.com.

American Craft Beer Week Manifesto

Additionally, craft beer fans from across the country can sign the American Craft Beer Week Manifesto, pledging their support to craft beer and their love for “the artisans who approach their craft with originality, dedication and passion.” From tap takeovers and tasting tours to food pairings and festivals, ACBW will be celebrated in many ways across the U.S. To find a local celebration, event or promotion, visit the above-mentioned ACBW events page.  A selection of scheduled 2013 celebrations includes:

American Craft Beer Week National Toast
Coast to Coast Toast to Craft Beer w/Stone Brewing Co.; Westerly, RI
ACBW Coast to Coast Toast at Iron Horse Taproom; Washington, D.C.
American Craft Beer Week Toast at Howells & Hood; Chicago, IL
Coast to Coast Toast to Boulder’s Craft Beer Phenomenon; Boulder, CO

Craft Breweries
Gritty McDuff’s Brewpub 25th Anniversary Celebration; Portland, ME
Mayflower Brewing Company 4th Annual Open House; Plymouth, MA
Anaheim Brewery Founder’s Day; Anaheim, CA
5th Annual Short’s to Short’s Paddle; Bellaire, MI
Meet the Brewers of the San Francisco Brewers Guild; San Francisco, CA
Rahr & Sons Summertime Wheat Glass Night; Dallas, TX
Right Brain Brewery – ACBW Firkin’ Friday; Traverse City, MI

Craft Beer Festivals
3rd Annual Ameri-CAN Canned Craft Beer Festival; Scottsdale, AZ
HopFest Kansas City 2013; Kansas City, MO
Brewers Association of MD “Maryland Craft Beer Festival”; Frederick, MD
2013 Wort Transformation Awards Ceremony; Papillion, NE
Third Annual Brews with Attitude Craft Beer Festival; Tampa, FL
Third EVER Mother’s Day Festival; Springfield, MO
Wheatstock; Lincoln Park, MI

Food and Beer Events
American Craft Beer Week – Spokane Style!; Spokane, WA
4 Course Dinner and Pairing Featuring Uinta Brewing Co.; Salt Lake City, UT
Elevation Beer Co. – Chef vs. Chef; Louisville, CO
Knee Deep Beer Dinner at 775 Gastropub; Reno, NV
Beer & Cheese Tasting with Teton Valley Creamery and 460 Bread; Victor, ID

Craft Beer Tastings and Tours
Brewery Rickoli American Craft Beer Week Releases; Wheat Ridge, CO
Crow Peak Night at the Ale House; Rapid City, SD
Old Chicago Tap Takeover featuring Odell Brewing Co.; All Colorado Locations
Roughtail Oaked Imperial Black Rye Ale Release at Tapwerks; Oklahoma City, OK
Shmaltz Brewing Media Ribbon Cutting Ceremony; Clifton Park, NY
Portsmouth Brewery – Brewing with Botanicals; Portsmouth, NH

State and Regional Beer Weeks Also Happening During ACBW
Chicago Craft Beer Week
Frederick Beer Week (MD)
Lexington Craft Beer Week (KY)
Long Island Craft Beer Week
San Antonio Beer Week
Santa Ynez Valley Beer Month (CA)
Seattle Beer Week
Session Beer Month