The Basics of Home Brewing

 

If you are a beer lover, you may have considered brewing beer at the comfort of your home. It’s not only economical; it’s also a great hobby that you could share with your friends. And by the end of your project, you’ll be welcomed with a cold glass of your very own beer.

Purchase a starter kit

As you begin to explore the art of brewing beer, getting a starting kit would be your best option. This kit contains all the supplies and equipments which are needed for home brewing, plus, detailed instructions also come with the package. This is especially recommended for beginners as you’ll be provided with everything you need for this project.

Prepare the ingredients

Surprisingly, beer involves a simple process. It’s basically just water with malt.

Most of the time, the ingredients needed in brewing are included in the home brew starter kit. As you master the art of brewing beer, you can start experimenting and add in hops, grains and malts. These could provide an added flavor to your beer.

Brewing the beer

Brewing beer is easy, especially if you’re using a starter kit. Follow these steps and start brewing your own beer.

Brewing – This process takes about 2 hours.

Start off by cleaning and sterilizing your equipments. Dissolve the brew in 2 to 4 liters of hot water then add in 1 Kg of dextrose or sugar. Then, put 10 liters of cold water in the fermenter, add the hot mixture and mix it well.

Top it up to 23 liters. When the temperature reaches below 30°, sprinkle it with brewer’s yeast.

Fermenting – This process takes about a week

This is where the magic happens! After adding the yeast, you can now seal the fermenter. Remember to partially fill the airlock with boiled, cooled water.

Allow the brew to ferment for a week, letting it stay at about 20 to 22°. Once you notice that the brew clears and the airlock stops bubbling, set aside for 48 hours. After this, you beer is ready for bottling.

Bottling

Make sure to sterilize all the caps and bottles. Add 1 tablespoon of sugar to each bottle. Fill the bottles, leaving 40mm from the top.

Cover the bottles and tilt each bottle for a few times in order to dissolve the sugar. Keep them in a warm place for about 5 days, then transfer them to a cooler place and let it stay for another 5 days. Leave it alone for another week. After this, you are free to enjoy your very own beer.

Colorado beer festival event calendar: Fall and winter

The madness that is  Week is in the rear-view mirror, and what better way to recover than to load up your calendar with more beer-soaked events around Colorado.

 

Chef N Brew
Thurs., Nov. 14
EXDO Event Center, 1399 35th St, Denver

The food and beer pairing event returns for a second year with 15 chefs and 15 brewers teaming up and attendees voting on their favorite combinations. The cramped quarters and long lines at last year’s venue, the Oriental Theater, drew complaints so the move is good news. See the participating chefs and brewers confirmed so far and get tickets here for $49 and $59.

Parade of Darks
Sat., Dec. 7, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Wynkoop Brewing, 1634 18th St, Denver, CO 80202

Liquid courage before the annual Parade of Lights downtown. The Wynkoop’s Fourth Annual Parade of Darks promises winter seasonal beers from more than 35 breweries. Benefits MetroCare Ring, the local hunger relief organization. Advance tickets are $35 and day-of-event tickets are $42, and all attendees receive a commemorative glass and unlimited sampling. Buy tickets and check out last year’s impressive pour list here.

Denver Beer Festivus
Sat., Dec. 14, 2 p.m.-6 p.m.
McNichols Building, 144 West Colfax Avenue, Denver

Here’s a way to drink beer from just about every single Denver brewery in one setting. The 2nd Denver Beer Festivus – borrowing the name of the faux “Seinfeld” holiday with feats of strength and airings of grievances – will feature at least 24 breweries from within our fair city limits. Nineteen breweries poured last year. Among the anticipated new arrivals: Factofum BrewhouseJagged Mountain Craft Brewery and Station 26 Brewing. Presented by Denver Off the Wagon and Imbibe Denver. Tickets are $40 and available here.

Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywine
Jan. 9-11, 2014
Vail Cascade Resort and Spa, Vail

The 14th annual installment of one of the state’s best beer festivals, featuring high-alcohol beers (7 percent is the minimum) and high altitude (8,150 feet). The main attraction is the Saturday afternoon tasting session featuring Colorado and national breweries, but the educational aspects make Big Beers different from a lot of fests. This year features seminars and workshops on saisons, cooking with beer, brewing with Brettanomyces and more. The bitter taste of the Broncos’ playoff loss to the Ravens lingers for those who attended last year’s event. Here is a link to the lineup and tickets sales for the commercial tasting and seminars. Tickets to the dinners and the special packages are sold out.

 

New App: Beer Hunt

Beer Hunt wants to be the “go-to app” for people who like to try interesting and new beers. It’s a social game. When you’re drinking a beer, you log in to document your beer and earn points and badges that can lead to rewards in the form of free beer.

Screen Shot 2013-09-24 at 12.43.30 PM

“The design of beer hunt is meant to be simple and fun,” said CEO Shaan Puri on stage. “It is beer after all!”

Upon signing up, you answer a brief beer quiz about beers you have tried and/or like. You can then earn points for trying different beers and rise up on a leaderboard. The application also features a “drink-o-graph” with information like your beer preferences and the time since your last beer. Puri said that while Beer Hunt is a fun game, in their case, “free beer is serious business.” Craft beer is booming right now and beer is the most popular drink in the world after water and tea. The team plans to make money by providing beer brands a channel to reach customers, based on what they like and what they have had in the past.

Make sure to check it out here: http://beerhunt.com/

Hopstories

Every bottle of craft beer you take off the shelf has a story. It’s written by individuals with the passion to start a brewery and the dedication to master the craft. We share their story, and the stories behind your favorite brews, in Hopstories.

Here’s a craft beer video documentary series I think you folks might like:

 

Why Are IPAs so Popular?

Four Reasons Why IPAs Are so Popular

  1. They taste good.
  2. They’re “advanced.”
  3. They have lots of flavor.
  4. Science!

IPAs Taste Good

It is important that Conley has separate entries for taste and flavor. It might interest you to know that they are not quite the same thing. Along with sight, smell, touch and hearing, taste is one of our five senses. Our taste buds recognize sweet, salty, sour, umami and bitter.

Bitter is certainly a major factor when tasting an IPA, as the style employs an increased amount of hops which can add what is often described as evident, bracing and even aggressive bitterness. Since everyone has slightly different tastes, what may be evident bitterness to one craft beer drinker may be bracing to another.

IPAs Are “Advanced”

While bitterness of an IPA has a lot to do with a person’s individual perception, we also know that tastes can change over time. You may not have enjoyed the first highly-hopped IPA you tried, but over time, perhaps you grew to really enjoy a bracingly bitter IPA—or not, that’s ok too!

Human taste is pre-wired from the time we’re born. For example, innately we like the taste of sweet things as children, but perhaps do not take to sour or bitter flavors right away. But as we grow up and try new things, our brain figures out that not all sour and bitter flavors are bad, such is the case with IPAs.

Experts believe that our sense of taste helped ancient humans choose what types of things were good to eat. To the human mind, a sweet taste translates to calories and energy, which is good for a hungry little hunter-gatherer. However, sour tastes may mean that the food has become rancid or is potentially poisonous.

IPA beer quote

Bitterness in beer is not bad, and actually often provides a refreshing balance. Wouldn’t beer be boring if it was just sugary sweet? So perhaps enjoying an IPA does signify a state of advanced beer appreciation. Being able to sense not just the bitterness of an IPA, but the more nuanced contributions hops add to a beer, such as aroma and flavor happens over time.

In a nut shell, beer drinkers are not pre-wired to like IPAs, you learn to like them, so in a weird way it can be a craft beer badge of honor to order one.

IPAs Have Lots of Flavor

While taste is one of our five senses, flavor is considered a synthetic sense, where a mix of stimuli come together and our brain works to recognize, record and recount a certain flavor. Taste plays a role in flavor, but all of the other senses work in cooperation to create flavor too.

When you drink an IPA, you experience a lot of different components, but your taste buds can really only tell you if what you are experiencing is sweet, bitter, sour, salty or umami. In this case, there might be some sweet and bitter, but when the taste of an IPA is paired with the aroma and golden color, you sense flavors like grapefruit, pine, roses, etc.

Science!

Each drinker’s personal taste is as unique as the fingerprints on their condensation-covered glass—it’s totally subjective. What one may like about the flavor of an IPA may be different from what another may or may not like about the style. I love IPAs, but do I love every IPA I try, not necessarily. Science is certainly a major player in the IPA discussion, from hop variety development, all the way to personal flavor perception.

Appropriately, Conley finishes with the obvious answer of, “They’re popular because damn, they’re tasty.” Does that mean that all examples of the style are tasty to everyone—no. Each of us has a unique set of tastes, both inherited and learned. Some will never like the bitterness of an IPA, and some will decide they do. Luckily, there are plenty of IPAs out there to test and train your taste buds.

 

A Glorious Map Of Craft Beer Across The U.S.

Infographic of the Day as Seen on FastCoDesign.com

Selected as the Infographic of the Day on Fast Company’s web site, this wonderfully created info graphic shows how craft beer has continued to flourish state-by-state. Enjoy this visual map of breweries, consumers and growth across our beer-boasting country.

[button link=”http://craftbrew.cirqlemedia.com/the-invasion-of-craft-breweries-in-the-u-s/” color=”orange”] The Invasion of Craft Breweries in the U.S. – Interactive Map[/button]

Which state makes the most craft beer? California. But that’s only part of the story. Lagunitas makes more than one amazing beer, as does Stone Brewing Co. Today, both of these once-tiny California breweries have blossomed into household names that you can spot on almost any decent tap. But they’re only two of the 316 craft breweries found in the monster state of California, which can boast almost double the craft breweries of the next mightiest beer state, Washington.

It’s one of many factoids you’ll pick up in The New Yorker’s interactive infographic that we have included here Mapping the Rise of Craft Beer. It employs a relatively simple interface–a few toggles and mouseovers–to convey an incredible amount of information, a brown, tan, and yellow state of the union of frothy fuzzyheadedness.

The new craft breweries in 2012.

Now, I know what you’re thinking: “I guess I’ve gotta move to California now.” Untrue! A more studied approach to consumption would be to weigh not just how many breweries are in a given state, but how many breweries are in a given state per person. In this regard, Vermont takes the crown. They may only have 25 craft breweries across the state, but with a population of only 626,201 people, that’s the best ratio of man to brewery in the U.S. Or if all-around performance is more your speed, Oregon should probably be your pick. It ranks fourth in variety, fifth in production, and second in breweries per capita.

It’s all enough to make a man wary of the sustainability of the craft beer movement. That is, until he cracks another cold one in the name of supporting the underdog.

[button link=”http://craftbrew.cirqlemedia.com/the-invasion-of-craft-breweries-in-the-u-s/” color=”orange”] The Invasion of Craft Breweries in the U.S. – Interactive Map[/button]

Jim Koch On How To Go From Kitchen to National Distribution

Happy Saturday beer enthusiasts.  I wanted to share a great article provided to us from Huffington Post.  While Sam Adams has bridged a fine line between micro and macro over the past decade, we can all agree that his story from home-brewer to national shelf space deserves merit. He took a small craft name back in 1984 to one of the most recognized beers in America.  In this interview, he shares some secrets for those trying to gain the respect of bars, taverns and stores across the country and abroad.

NEW YORK — The Boston Beer Company, maker of Samuel Adams Boston Lager, hardly fits the image of a craft brewer anymore, although it retains that designation. Since it was founded in 1984, the company’s success is legendary: It has grown from a kitchen-brewing project into the fifth-largest domestic beer company in the United States that sells a wide range of alcoholic beverages. Last year, the company had annual revenue of $629 million.

But despite its size, Boston Beer has been waging a publicity campaign to cement its role as the grandfather of the crafts. One piece of that campaign is its small business lending program, called Brewing the American Dream, that it has run since 2008. This comes as the definition of who is and who is not a craft brewer has become a charged political topic because of special tax breaks in recent years.

Public relations aside, the program has helped small businesses. So far at least 230 food and drink entrepreneurs — including a dozen craft brewing companies — have borrowed nearly $2 million total. This year, Boston Beer expanded its lending program with business coaching events that will take place across the country.

The Huffington Post recently spoke with the company’s founder Jim Koch how he grew Sam Adams from a home-brew to huge business.

When did you know Sam Adams was going to be more than a brewing project in your kitchen?

I didn’t have an office or a desk — literally I was making beer or delivering it or selling it — and I called into our answering service and there was a message from a bar that I hadn’t even visited. They wanted 10 cases. I never thought people would be calling me for my beer! I always thought nobody would want this unless I sold it to them personally. That was around June 1985 and we had only been on market for a couple months.

Big beer has pretty solid grip on distribution. How did you start getting stores to sell your beer?

There was a store in the Back Bay and they didn’t carry Sam Adams and the owner said ‘No one asks me for it.’ So I took a bunch of empties and put them behind in the alley and I knew homeless people would take them in to redeem them. I got people redeeming the empties and that convinced him.

How can a small beer company actually get some prime shelf space?

For us, it’s asking for it personally. That works in the independent stores but big chains generally have these things called plano-grams or schematics, which are often done by big brewers and they are doing shelf set and they determine the prime shelf space. In addition to abject begging, which sometimes works, we also point out that Sam Adams is leading craft beer and it should have eye-level shelf space.

Where should a craft beer focus on getting distributed first, a bar or a store?

To me, it was bars because that’s where consumers are. It’s still where they are most likely to try something new. If they don’t like it, they only ordered a pint and they are not stuck with five more bottles.

Can a craft beer brewer really get a Bud-in-a-can man to try something new?

We can get mass domestic drinker. I have been getting them for 29 years. When I started it was pretty much what everyone drank, but we have converted a lot of those drinkers. There are times when a mass domestic drinker wants to drink something with more flavor and taste but sometimes craft brew drinkers want something poundable and thirst-quenching. Beer drinkers are less stereotypical than you think.

Are there too many craft beers?

There can never be too many good beers!

Are there too many not-so-good craft beers?

My dad would say all beer is good, some beer is better. But all beer is good, and I think that’s true. All are good when they are made, but issues are with smaller-volume, slower-moving beers that get stale and are stale when you buy them and you get beer that doesn’t even meet the standards of the brewer.

There are a lot of new beers on the market. What’s the best marketing trick to stand out?

You don’t need marketing. We didn’t and we were a successful brewery before we hired our first marketing person. When we did a new beer, we just changed the color of the label. We had some radio commercials. But I wrote them and I was the voice. And it worked. The idea that marketing has any significant role is a myth. As a small brewer you cannot compete with the big guys. They were doing a bunch of TV ads, so I got on radio and just talked and I told people about malt, yeast and about things that were missing in the conversation about beer.

Jim, how many beers do you drink a day?

It’s an average of two a day. It goes between one and four. And if I do that math, that’s 21,000 since I started making it. I drink the Boston Lager, the original. I have bottles in my refrigerator.

This interview has been edited for clarity and length. The lede has been updated to make it clear that Boston Beer Company is a craft-brewing company.

Story credit from Catherine New – Huffington Post

8 of the Best Beer Towns in America, 2 Spots Remain

The history of beer in the United States is a rich one dating back to the colonies, when soldiers were paid in spruce beer and cider. From there beer weathered a Revolution, Prohibition and a right turn at Albuquerque before positively exploding with deregulation of the industry through the early 1980s.

Ever since, Americans have been sampling, celebrating and sophisticating the unofficial national beverage in ways previously unimaginable, and it seems nearly every town’s gotten into the act.

But not all cities are carbonated equal. Some have begun to take beer personally, innovating its craft and consumption and throwing festivals to honor the finest ales and lagers — creating a blueprint for the rest of the country to follow. Still others have been doing this all along.

This is the story of those towns, the top eight cities in America for beer explorers. While only 8 made our 2013 Cirqle Media list, we recognize that hundreds of cities from coast to coast and around the globe have a passion and fever for their hometown brew.  I encourage you to list your town and favorite draft or native tap – but be sure to explain why you hold a special spot in your heart for your brew.  You might just make the list to round out our final 10-best cities.

We’ve scored each out of 1-10 for history, breweries, bars and events, and would like to think every one of you will read the whole piece quietly, captions and all, nodding sagely as the indisputable truth of every line hits home. But, this is the Internet and if there’s one place where froth belongs besides the top of your pint of ale, it’s the comment box below.

1. Portland, Oregon

History: 6
Breweries: 10
Bars: 10
Events: 7

Portland boasts more breweries (52) than any city in the world. It’s also America’s largest craft brewing market, with 69 breweries in the greater metro area, owing to state sales regulations that favor consumer tastes over discounts and kickbacks, allowing small brewers to compete with mass marketers.

But the Rose City isn’t just about quantity. PDX is where you’ll find Hopworks Urban Brewery, Alameda Brewing Company, Cascade Brewing, and family-owned Hair Of The Dog, all nationally renowned for their care and creativity.

Fairs like The Oregon Brewer’s Festival, the Portland International Beer Festival, and Portland Beer Week — America’s first organic beer festival — ensure that beer spirit in the city runs high all year, while Biketobeerfest celebrates two things exalted by the region: bikes and beer. Portland is also home to five of Draft magazine’s top 100 craft bars — Saraveza Bottle Shop & Pasty Tavern, Horse Brass Pub, Apex, Bailey’s Tap Room, and Belmont Station.

Top draws: Hopworks Urban Crosstown Pale, Deschutes Hop Trip Ale

2. San Francisco, California

History: 8
Breweries: 9
Bars: 9
Events: 7

The Bay Area is bursting with micro- and nanobreweries that have been experimenting with food-inspired brews like nowhere else. Take Almanac, which uses seasonal produce in its brews, or Moonlight Brewing Company, which picks redwood twigs and cedar bark from brewer Brian Hunt’s own backyard.

There’s history here, too. The sale of Anchor Steam Brewery in the 1960s precipitated the production of several signature beers at a time when mass-marketed light beers were the trend. The following decade saw the opening of New Albion Brewing in Sonoma, the first new brewery in California since Prohibition and the first microbrewery in America.

Following suit have been 21st Amendment Brewery, Speakeasy, Drake’s, Black Diamond and Social Kitchen and Brewery. Notable bars include La Trappe Cafe and The Toronado Pub, which hosts arguably America’s preeminent barleywine festival. And finally, there’s San Francisco’s Beer Week and the San Francisco International Beer Fest.

Top draws: Moylan’s Tipperary Pale Ale, 21st Amendment Brew

3. San Diego, California

History: 5
Breweries: 10
Bars: 9
Events: 8

There are 67 breweries in San Diego and another 13 slated for opening this year. With 60-plus breweries in the county and its own IPA category, San Diego’s a beacon on any beer explorer’s map. For a pint, hit up Jay Porter’s beer-centric restaurant, the Linkery, which offers brew-paired dinners, and Toronado, which boasts an exhaustive beer list.

A trip to San Diego isn’t complete without sampling the suds at Karl Strauss, Ballast Point, Lost Abbey, Green Flash, and Stone Brewing Co., declared by BeerAdvocate magazine the “All-Time Top Brewery on Planet Earth.”

As for events, San Diego was chosen to host the 2012 World Beer Cup — the “Olympics of Beer” — and San Diego Beer Week draws crowds from all over to celebrate 10 days of tastings, pairings and live music. If you visit, don’t miss five San Diego bars mentioned in Draft mag’s top 100 American beer bars: Tiger! Tiger!, Small Bar, O’Brien’s American Pub, Blind Lady Ale House, and Hamilton’s Tavern.

Top draws: Alpine Ale, Lost Abbey Duck Duck Gooze

4. Boston, Massachusetts

History: 10
Breweries: 7
Bars: 8
Events: 7

The first brewery in Massachusetts emerged not long after the Pilgrims dropped anchor, owing to the fact that beer was safer to drink than the water. Though the Pilgrims were aiming for Virginia, they ran out of brew and stopped in Massachusetts — thus a beer town was born.

Eventually, Boston was blessed with a number of microbreweries, including the best-selling craft brewer in America, Boston Beer Co. — producer of Samuel Adams — and Harpoon Brewery. Notable hits on the bar crawl include Cambridge and Cape Ann Brewing Cos., Deep Ellum and The Publick House, alongside historic pubs like Green Dragon, The Warren Tavern (Boston’s oldest) and Sunset Grill & Tap.

With this lively scene, it’s not hard to believe that Boston consumes the most beer per capita in the United States. It’s also home to the American Craft Beer Fest, the East Coast’s largest celebration of domestic micros, featuring 600+ varieties from 125+ American brewers.

Top draws: Harpoon IPA, Beer Works Bunker Hill Blueberry Ale

5. Denver, Colorado

History: 7
Breweries: 8
Bars: 7
Events: 8

Colorado is fourth out of 50 states in breweries per capita, and while there are only a handful in Denver proper, there are loads of notable breweries outside town and in nearby Boulder.

Neighborhoods like Platte Street and the Art District on Santa Fe are peppered with breweries. Elsewhere you’ll find Avery, Renegade, New Belgium, Strange Brewing, Dry Dock and others, including Bull & Bush, which writer Steve Body declared “may well be America’s best brewpub and restaurant.”

Denver’s first craft brewery, Wynkoop, was opened in 1988 by John Hickenlooper, who went on to become mayor, then governor, extending Denver’s brewer reach to the highest levels of government. Both Wynkoop and Great Divide are a moon shot from Coors Field, and homemade beers at Blue Moon Brewing Co. are found just behind section 112 in left field.

The Mile-High City also stages what is widely regarded the largest, most prestigious beer festival in the country, the annual Great American Beer Festival, drawing sudsmeliers from all over the world to taste more than 2,200 brews.

Top Draws: Denver Graham Cracker Porter, Renegade Hammer and Sickle

6. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

History: 9
Breweries: 6
Bars: 8
Events: 7

In the city of brewery love, outfits like Victory, Sly Fox, Nodding Head, Yards and Flying Fish have been vanguards of local brewing since the city’s barley rush of the 1990s. And since 1860, McGillin’s Olde Ale House has been a beloved showcase for those and other local brews longer than any in Philly.

Three less-ancient bars made Draft mag’s top 100 — Eulogy Belgian Tavern, Grey Lodge Public House and Memphis Taproom, which enjoys a sterling reputation despite an endorsement by Guy Fieri. And no beer itinerary is complete without writer Michael Jackson’s favorite spot, Monk’s Cafe, a love letter to Belgian (and other) brews that will awe the savviest palate.

Philly Beer Week is the city’s most hoppening event, but the Greater Northeast Philadelphia Beer Festival, begun in 2011, is already proving a worthy companion. One caveat to all this beer-fueled euphoria: complicated state controls regulate the purchase of packaged beer. Don’t let them kill your buzz.

Top Draws: Yards Philadelphia Pale Ale, Victory Hop Devil IPA

7. Bend, Oregon

History: 5
Breweries: 8
Bars: 8
Events: 8

With one brewery for every 9,111 people, descriptors for Bend include “beervana” and “Beer City, USA.” And that number is constantly changing, with newcomers like Crux Fermentation Project and Worthy Brewing Company recently fattening Bend’s ranks.

Already cemented into Bend beer culture is Deschutes, the godfather of local craft brewing, which recently expanded its flagship location. The Ale Apothecary, like its name suggests, blends modern and old-fashioned brewing techniques for what they’re calling Bend’s only steampunk brewery.

Getting your beer passport stamped at all nine of participating breweries on the Bend Ale Trail will net you a prize, and dog lovers will appreciate Boneyard Beer, where they can try the world’s first organic, non-alcoholic brew made for dogs, Dawg Grogg.

Your itinerary’s bound to overlap at least one of Bend’s annual beer celebrations, like Central Oregon Beer Week, The Little Woody Barrel-Aged Brew & Whiskey Festival, Bend BrewFest, The Fermentation Celebration and Bend Oktoberfest.

Top Draws: Deschutes Inversion IPA, Silver Moon Hound’s Tooth Amber

8. Asheville, North Carolina

History: 5
Breweries: 7
Bars: 7
Events: 9

Yes, Asheville. It’s relatively new to the beer scene, but with 11 breweries yielding the highest per-capita total in the country, it’s already building a global rep. A day trip to Asheville offers a chance to try roughly 50 local beers, almost all of which can be tasted at The Thirsty Monk, a must-see on any Ashevillian beer pilgrimage.

But it’s less the number of breweries or bars here than it is the culture that earns Asheville its cred. There is serious pride in the local craft, and its small-town appeal means all you have to do is roll over and you’ll find yourself in one of the city’s renowned breweries, like Wedge, Green Man and Wicked Weed.

The city also pumps beer into mustards, shampoos, ice creams, cakes, dog biscuits, and soaps. And with at least five major beer events, Asheville keeps the party going all year round with its own Oktoberfest, Beer Week and Winter Warmer, Best Firkin, Beer City and Brewgrass Festivals.

Top Draws: Asheville Shiva IPA, French Broad Ryehopper

Celebrate American Craft Beer Week from Coast to Coast

In support of Craft Breweries from coast to coast, Cirqle Media and Brewing-A-Brand would like to encourage all our craft beer fans to get out and celebrate their love for our nations’ best hops, barley and wheat.  From May 13-19, craft beer connoisseurs and beginners alike will come together for the eighth annual celebration of American Craft Beer Week (ACBW). With the tagline “Big Week, Small Breweries,” ACBW is an opportunity to toast the more than 2,400 small and independent American craft brewers who continue to make the U.S. the world’s most diverse brewing destination. Once again, ACBW celebrations are expected to be held across all 50 states.

“The popularity of American Craft Beer Week is indicative of the craft beer renaissance that continues to captivate the U.S.,” said Julia Herz, publisher of CraftBeer.com and craft beer program director at the Brewers Association. “This week is about uniting for a common cause: support and celebration of our nation’s small and independent brewers and the millions of beer lovers who have helped evolve an industry and put the U.S. on the brewing map.”

New for 2013 is the American Craft Beer Week Coast to Coast Toast. For the first time ever, ACBW will be commemorated by a simultaneous toast. At 8:00 p.m. ET/5:00 p.m. PT on Thursday, May 16, small brewers and craft beer lovers nationwide will raise a glass of their favorite craft brewed beer to toast ACBW and the delicious beer that it celebrates. To find a toast location near you, visit the official American Craft Beer Week events page, hosted by CraftBeer.com.

American Craft Beer Week Manifesto

Additionally, craft beer fans from across the country can sign the American Craft Beer Week Manifesto, pledging their support to craft beer and their love for “the artisans who approach their craft with originality, dedication and passion.” From tap takeovers and tasting tours to food pairings and festivals, ACBW will be celebrated in many ways across the U.S. To find a local celebration, event or promotion, visit the above-mentioned ACBW events page.  A selection of scheduled 2013 celebrations includes:

American Craft Beer Week National Toast
Coast to Coast Toast to Craft Beer w/Stone Brewing Co.; Westerly, RI
ACBW Coast to Coast Toast at Iron Horse Taproom; Washington, D.C.
American Craft Beer Week Toast at Howells & Hood; Chicago, IL
Coast to Coast Toast to Boulder’s Craft Beer Phenomenon; Boulder, CO

Craft Breweries
Gritty McDuff’s Brewpub 25th Anniversary Celebration; Portland, ME
Mayflower Brewing Company 4th Annual Open House; Plymouth, MA
Anaheim Brewery Founder’s Day; Anaheim, CA
5th Annual Short’s to Short’s Paddle; Bellaire, MI
Meet the Brewers of the San Francisco Brewers Guild; San Francisco, CA
Rahr & Sons Summertime Wheat Glass Night; Dallas, TX
Right Brain Brewery – ACBW Firkin’ Friday; Traverse City, MI

Craft Beer Festivals
3rd Annual Ameri-CAN Canned Craft Beer Festival; Scottsdale, AZ
HopFest Kansas City 2013; Kansas City, MO
Brewers Association of MD “Maryland Craft Beer Festival”; Frederick, MD
2013 Wort Transformation Awards Ceremony; Papillion, NE
Third Annual Brews with Attitude Craft Beer Festival; Tampa, FL
Third EVER Mother’s Day Festival; Springfield, MO
Wheatstock; Lincoln Park, MI

Food and Beer Events
American Craft Beer Week – Spokane Style!; Spokane, WA
4 Course Dinner and Pairing Featuring Uinta Brewing Co.; Salt Lake City, UT
Elevation Beer Co. – Chef vs. Chef; Louisville, CO
Knee Deep Beer Dinner at 775 Gastropub; Reno, NV
Beer & Cheese Tasting with Teton Valley Creamery and 460 Bread; Victor, ID

Craft Beer Tastings and Tours
Brewery Rickoli American Craft Beer Week Releases; Wheat Ridge, CO
Crow Peak Night at the Ale House; Rapid City, SD
Old Chicago Tap Takeover featuring Odell Brewing Co.; All Colorado Locations
Roughtail Oaked Imperial Black Rye Ale Release at Tapwerks; Oklahoma City, OK
Shmaltz Brewing Media Ribbon Cutting Ceremony; Clifton Park, NY
Portsmouth Brewery – Brewing with Botanicals; Portsmouth, NH

State and Regional Beer Weeks Also Happening During ACBW
Chicago Craft Beer Week
Frederick Beer Week (MD)
Lexington Craft Beer Week (KY)
Long Island Craft Beer Week
San Antonio Beer Week
Santa Ynez Valley Beer Month (CA)
Seattle Beer Week
Session Beer Month