Home Brewing History

home-brew

Back then, home brewing was popular among Mesopotamians, Egyptians and Chinese. The recipes they used where then shared with the Romans and Greeks. However, it was the Sumerians who made an effort to write down these recipes. Since very little among the Sumerians were able to read and write, they would sing these recipes to Ninkasi, the beer goddess.

Ancient times

Nothing stays the same during the early civilization. While other rise into power, some were killed or assimilated. Because of this, changes among the laws were also made.

During the ancient times, the Pilgrims agreed to build a brewery upon reaching the Plymouth Rock. This was done so it would be easier for them to make more alcohol when their supplies got low.

Mass production of alcoholic beverages wasn’t done until the age of the Industrial Revolution, which was in the 1700s. Here, thermometers and hydrometers were developed which aided with the brewing process. These tools allowed them to create quality beverages and made the process a lot easier.

The process of home brewing was brought to a whole new level thanks to Louis Pasteur, a French microbiologist who explained the effects of yeast in the fermentation process. Due to this new discovery, home brewers have started to come up with varying strains of yeast that yield wines and beers of different complexities.

Prohibition Act

Everything seems to be going well, but then times changed. The Prohibition Act was passed in the United States, making it illegal to brew and drink alcohol. Despite the implementation of this law, people continued to brew and drink alcohol at home. And since no one could buy alcohol outside, a group of brewers came up with the Moonshine and Bathtub Gin to address the people’s cravings.

Eventually, the need for grape juice became evident. Grape growers decided to acquire more fields in order to sustain with the growing demand.

In 1933, the act was repealed. However, this only legalized home brewing wine. Brewing beer remained illegal until 1979, when President Jimmy Carter signed the bill which lifted the ban.