The Basics of Home Brewing

 

If you are a beer lover, you may have considered brewing beer at the comfort of your home. It’s not only economical; it’s also a great hobby that you could share with your friends. And by the end of your project, you’ll be welcomed with a cold glass of your very own beer.

Purchase a starter kit

As you begin to explore the art of brewing beer, getting a starting kit would be your best option. This kit contains all the supplies and equipments which are needed for home brewing, plus, detailed instructions also come with the package. This is especially recommended for beginners as you’ll be provided with everything you need for this project.

Prepare the ingredients

Surprisingly, beer involves a simple process. It’s basically just water with malt.

Most of the time, the ingredients needed in brewing are included in the home brew starter kit. As you master the art of brewing beer, you can start experimenting and add in hops, grains and malts. These could provide an added flavor to your beer.

Brewing the beer

Brewing beer is easy, especially if you’re using a starter kit. Follow these steps and start brewing your own beer.

Brewing – This process takes about 2 hours.

Start off by cleaning and sterilizing your equipments. Dissolve the brew in 2 to 4 liters of hot water then add in 1 Kg of dextrose or sugar. Then, put 10 liters of cold water in the fermenter, add the hot mixture and mix it well.

Top it up to 23 liters. When the temperature reaches below 30°, sprinkle it with brewer’s yeast.

Fermenting – This process takes about a week

This is where the magic happens! After adding the yeast, you can now seal the fermenter. Remember to partially fill the airlock with boiled, cooled water.

Allow the brew to ferment for a week, letting it stay at about 20 to 22°. Once you notice that the brew clears and the airlock stops bubbling, set aside for 48 hours. After this, you beer is ready for bottling.

Bottling

Make sure to sterilize all the caps and bottles. Add 1 tablespoon of sugar to each bottle. Fill the bottles, leaving 40mm from the top.

Cover the bottles and tilt each bottle for a few times in order to dissolve the sugar. Keep them in a warm place for about 5 days, then transfer them to a cooler place and let it stay for another 5 days. Leave it alone for another week. After this, you are free to enjoy your very own beer.

The Basics of Beer Marketing

Craft beer is one of the most profitable and fastest growing segments of the beer industry. It’s also a very competitive and crowded market, so you’ll have to work hard and stand out among the competition if you wish to succeed in this industry.

In this business, success could be translated to being different. This article could help you in focusing on the key factors that would contribute to your business’ success.

Know the market

Every market is unique. Thus, you’ll have to understand what makes you area different in order to build a profitable business.

Here, you should be able to gather as much information about beer drinkers (your prospective clients) and your competitors. As you learn more about your prospects and competitors, you’ll be able to come up with an effective marketing plan that would set you apart from these existing establishments, reach your target audience and penetrate the market.

Create your brand

Your brand is more than just a logo. It’s how you present your business to your customers. A great brand provides its clients with an interesting story. As you introduce your brand to the market, you’ll want to capture their attention and connect with your customers.

Once you capture their attention, this becomes the core of your identity. If possible, try to incorporate it through your marketing plan in order to create a more powerful presence.

Improve your product

More than anything, your product will be the center of your business. So, it is important to provide your customers with a great product. Also, device a plan on how to carry your brand story through the product you offer.

Create excitement among your customers

Getting your customers excited is an important aspect of your marketing plan. Execute your plans early on and engage beer drinkers to follow you until your launching day. A lot of beer drinkers get thrilled with the introduction of new breweries. By going with the right approach, you could easily create a buzz among the beer drinking community even before you start selling.

By putting up your own site combined with the power of social media, you can easily reach your target audience and provide them with the necessary information as you prepare for the launch of your brewery.

 

Top Winter Beers at Colorado’s Craft Breweries

One of the most glorious and distinct harbingers of winter in Colorado is the appearance of seasonal beers. Winter is the time to take advantage of flavors such as roasted malts, chocolate, pepper spice and caramel. Below are a few winter warmers from Colorado craft breweries to keep an eye out for, according to Colorado.com.

Left Hand Brewery in Longmont boasts two winter brews. Fade to Black, which was the 2010 Great American Beer Festival’s Gold Medal-winner (foreign stout category), has rich notes of licorice, espresso bean and molasses. Good Juju, the reincarnation of the former year-round offering Juju Ginger, is a bit lighter but has the seasonal spiciness that only comes from brewing with pungent ginger.

It’s said that the San Juan Mountain snowpack is responsible for the quality and freshness of the Winter Ale from Durango Brewing Co. Those who live in this southwestern town demand great après-ski beers, and this ale, with a lightly fruity taste and cocoa finish delivers. Plus, it’s available by the growler from the Main Ave. Tap Room, making it easy to enjoy by the fire at home or in your ski condo.

Boulder Beer Company calls its Never Summer Ale “assertively hopped” which sounds scary, but isn’t if you like beers with a ruby-red hue. Beloved by Boulderites as an après-ski standard, the ale was a gold-medal winner in the 2004 World Beer Cup.

New Belgium Brewing in Fort Collins developed a cult-like following for its 2° Below Winter Ale from inception. It’s one of the brewery’s most beloved small batches, delivering a slightly hoppy beer with some pepper and spice that pair perfectly with Monterey Jack cheese, dark meats and desserts featuring pears or apples.

Once brewed only in small batches for employees of Coors, AC Golden Brewing Company’s (a subsidiary of MillerCoors in Golden) crisp Winterfest lager has gained a faithful following since they started brewing slightly larger batches. One of the most fun things about this one is its exclusivity — you can only get it in Colorado.

Though the Northstar Imperial Porter brewed each winter by Boulder’s Twisted Pine Brewing Company is extremely enjoyable at the time of purchase, it’s also brewed to last. Connoisseurs can stow a six pack away in a cool, dark spot to savor its deliciously aged, full-bodied malted flavors a few winters from now.

Great Divide Brewing Company’s richly malted Hibernation Ale should be sipped cautiously — with 8.7 percent alcohol by volume, it’s one of the strongest winter selections. What really takes center stage, however, are the ale’s chocolate and dark fruit flavors. Visit their Denver tap room’s monthly beer-and-cheese pairing to find out what goes best with this winter favorite.

Other Colorado Craft Brews to Try

Estes Park Brewery’s German-style High Altitude Alt
Kannah Creek Brewing Company
’s Rudolph’s Revenge malty red ale (Grand Junction)
Breckenridge Brewery
’s hearty chocolate and caramel Christmas Ale
Avery Brewing Company
’s hazelnutty Old Jubilation Ale (Boulder)
Odell Brewing Co.
’s subtly sweet Isolation Ale (Fort Collins)
Pagosa Brewing Company
’s chocolate-and-vanilla-tinged Pack-It-In Wassail Ale (Pagosa Springs)

Many of these breweries offer tours of their operations, a particularly festive way to get your taste on. For information on all of Colorado’s craft brewers, visit the Colorado Brewers Guild.

– See more at: http://www.colorado.com/articles/top-winter-beers-colorados-craft-breweries#sthash.gFGQKOZT.dpuf

5 Clues to Deciphering Craft Beer Styles

Understanding what a beer might taste like from its name alone can be a little daunting. Despite the craft beer community’s welcoming nature, it is easy to see why newcomers might feel lost when looking at a beer menu. Wheat, weizen and wit—each are different styles with specific histories and characteristics, but all are fairly similar in composition. It can be confusing!

While some beer styles require a bit of background to understand, one can often make reasonable assumptions about a beer’s character with a small amount of information. Here is a list of five clues that will help you quickly decipher what a beer might taste like before ordering that we wanted to share!

1. Origin/Region

A beer style’s country or region of origin goes a long way in providing clues to what the beer might taste like. The classic beer styles were developed over hundreds of years and were greatly impacted by regional and environmental variables like geography, climate and water chemistry.

Is it impossible to make a German lager outside of Germany? Of course not! As world travel became easier and the science of brewing was better understood, brewers began to mimic water qualities of specific regions and wrangle yeast cells to attain beer qualities once unique to certain ares of the world. Today, many American craft brewers have become skilled at brewing lagers similar to those originally crafted in Bavaria, hoppy IPAs reminiscent of the Burton-on-Trent region (Staffordshire, UK), roasty stouts indicative of Dublin, Ireland, and even the mysteriously tart and complex beers of Flanders, Belgium.

Of course there are exceptions to every rule, but these geographic-centric terms found in beer style names can offer clues about a beer’s character.

Origin Clues

  • German-style | lager with complex malt character and floral hops
  • Belgian-style | fruity, spicy ales or sour beers
  • English-style | pale ales, porters and stouts with earthy hop character
  • American-style | hop-forward beers with flavors of pine, citrus and resin
  • Belgo-American | fruity and spicy Belgian yeast flavor with American-style hop character

2. Color

You eat with your eyes, right? Well, you drink with them too. Colors play a factor in beer appreciation and have become popular for naming derivatives of classic styles (e.g., black IPA, white IPA). Classic beer styles include a fair number of beers named after their color, and you can often make a good guess of a beer’s malt flavor just by knowing its name and seeing it in a glass.

Color Clues

  • Light/Pale | Flavors: grainy, bread-like | Styles: blonde ale, helles, Belgian-style wit
  • Amber | Flavors: toasty, bread crust | Styles: amber ale, amber lager
  • Brown | Flavors: toast, roasted nuts, chocolate | Styles: brown ale, Marzen, dopplebock
  • Black | Flavors: burnt toast, dark chocolate, coffee, espresso | Styles: dry stout, robust porter, American black ale

3. Special Ingredients

There is no better clue when anticipating what a beer may taste like than having one or more of the star ingredients in the name. Some of these ingredients are so popular that they have become recognized with their own style categories. Special ingredients range in intensity, but there is usually an expectation that the brewer will aim to strike a balance, ensuring that the base style still prevails while the added notes sing.

Common Special Ingredients

  • Chocolate
  • Coffee
  • Fruit | raspberries, strawberries, peaches, cherries, etc.
  • Herb and Spices | cinnamon, ginger, cardamom, heather, etc.

4. Yeast

The type of yeast used in a style has a great impact on the final beer. The standard explanation is that beer is divided into two categories: ales and lagers. Of course, like with most things, a gray area exists. Today’s brewers are using nontraditional yeasts, blending different types of yeast and using traditional yeast in untraditional ways. It’s not quite as cut and dry as ale and lager, but some generalities do exist.

Ales

Ales ferment at warmer temperatures; because of this, they often present more yeast-derived flavors (fruity, sometimes spicy). Usually when you see the term ale, you can anticipate that yeast flavors provide some, if not much, of the flavor you will experience. When you enjoy a Belgian-style dubbel, you tend to taste a lot of fruit. Fruit flavors don’t necessarily mean that there is fruit in the beer, but rather that the yeast used has provided those flavors. We call fruity yeast flavors esters. A common example of esters is seen in German weizens, in the flavor perceived as banana.

Lagers

Lagers ferment at cooler temperatures and create a much “cleaner” beer, allowing you to taste the malt and hops more explicitly. As a test, try tasting an amber ale and amber lager side by side. Both will have generally the same ingredients, but the flavors will differ because of the yeast that was used.

5. Vessel/ Vintage/ Volume

Vessel

Beer that has been aged can pick up the flavors of the vessel it has spent time in. Barrels, are one of the most common aging vessels. If a barrel has never been used, the beer can present flavors of the wood itself, usually oak. Oak flavors can be spicy, woody or even vanilla-like, depending on how the barrel was prepared. If the barrel had been previously used for another beverage (wine or spirits), there may be some residual flavors from those present as well. So if you don’t like the taste of bourbon, beware of a bourbon barrel-aged beer.

Vintage

A vintage denotes the year a beer was produced. While in most cases beer should be enjoyed fresh, there are certain styles that can develop positively when aged. If you see that a beer has a vintage, you can assume it has a relatively high ABV, as alcohol has preservative qualities. Additionally, you might expect the flavors to be more complex when compared to a fresh example of the same beer.

Volume: “These go to 11.”

Volume usually denotes either flavor or strength. Words like “strong,” “sour” and “session” act as clues to what you might experience. These clues, when coupled with your basic understanding of the base style, should allow you to make a solid guess about the beer.

  • Strong ale | an ale of significant alcoholic strength
  • Sweet stout | very dark, sweet, full-bodied, slightly roasty ale
  • Robust porter | substantial, malty dark ale with a complex and flavorful roasty character
  • Session IPA | characteristics of a traditional IPA, but with less alcoholic strength
  • Imperial stout | a stronger version of the original stout style

The Big Picture

Even in the best beer establishments, there won’t always be someone to answer questions about a draught list. Learning the basics about a few of the more common beer styles will go a long way in helping you order something you’ll enjoy!

http://www.craftbeer.com/craft-beer-muses/5-clues-to-deciphering-craft-beer-styles

Colorado beer festival event calendar: Fall and winter

The madness that is  Week is in the rear-view mirror, and what better way to recover than to load up your calendar with more beer-soaked events around Colorado.

 

Chef N Brew
Thurs., Nov. 14
EXDO Event Center, 1399 35th St, Denver

The food and beer pairing event returns for a second year with 15 chefs and 15 brewers teaming up and attendees voting on their favorite combinations. The cramped quarters and long lines at last year’s venue, the Oriental Theater, drew complaints so the move is good news. See the participating chefs and brewers confirmed so far and get tickets here for $49 and $59.

Parade of Darks
Sat., Dec. 7, 1 p.m.-4 p.m.
Wynkoop Brewing, 1634 18th St, Denver, CO 80202

Liquid courage before the annual Parade of Lights downtown. The Wynkoop’s Fourth Annual Parade of Darks promises winter seasonal beers from more than 35 breweries. Benefits MetroCare Ring, the local hunger relief organization. Advance tickets are $35 and day-of-event tickets are $42, and all attendees receive a commemorative glass and unlimited sampling. Buy tickets and check out last year’s impressive pour list here.

Denver Beer Festivus
Sat., Dec. 14, 2 p.m.-6 p.m.
McNichols Building, 144 West Colfax Avenue, Denver

Here’s a way to drink beer from just about every single Denver brewery in one setting. The 2nd Denver Beer Festivus – borrowing the name of the faux “Seinfeld” holiday with feats of strength and airings of grievances – will feature at least 24 breweries from within our fair city limits. Nineteen breweries poured last year. Among the anticipated new arrivals: Factofum BrewhouseJagged Mountain Craft Brewery and Station 26 Brewing. Presented by Denver Off the Wagon and Imbibe Denver. Tickets are $40 and available here.

Big Beers, Belgians and Barleywine
Jan. 9-11, 2014
Vail Cascade Resort and Spa, Vail

The 14th annual installment of one of the state’s best beer festivals, featuring high-alcohol beers (7 percent is the minimum) and high altitude (8,150 feet). The main attraction is the Saturday afternoon tasting session featuring Colorado and national breweries, but the educational aspects make Big Beers different from a lot of fests. This year features seminars and workshops on saisons, cooking with beer, brewing with Brettanomyces and more. The bitter taste of the Broncos’ playoff loss to the Ravens lingers for those who attended last year’s event. Here is a link to the lineup and tickets sales for the commercial tasting and seminars. Tickets to the dinners and the special packages are sold out.

 

Pucker Up, America: Beers Are Going Sour

Do you think you can handle the sour side of beer? There’s a new kid on the craft brewing block, and it’s going to knock your salivary glands into action. Here is an awesome article we found on this new trend that we wanted to share.

It’s called “sour beer.” When you take a sip, it’s like biting into a Granny Smith apple that’s soaked in a French red wine: crisp, refreshing and a bit odd.

Sour beers are probably the oldest style of brew in the world, but they’re just starting to get popular in the States. They were all the buzz at this year’s Great American Beer Festival. And with hundreds of brewers now dabbling in sours, it’s easier than ever to find them at a local bar or grocery store.

Most sour beers have few or no hops. So they’re a good option to try if you don’t like bitter beers or you’re a wine lover who prefers a pinot noir to a Pilsner, says New Belgium‘s CEO, Kim Jordan of Fort Collins, Colo.

New Belgium, which produces the ubiquitous Fat Tire Ale, has started a whole series of sour beers called Lips of Faith — one of the most widely available lines of sour.

So what in the heck are these strange brews?

Sours beers are to the adult beverage world what yogurt is to dairy. Its beer that’s been intentionally spoiled by bacteria — the good bacteria.

“We use the same microbes that make yogurt, miso and salami,” says Alex Wallash, who co-founded The Rare Barrel, in Berkeley, Calif., one of the few breweries in the U.S. devoted solely to making sour beers.

Bacteria gobble up sugars in the beer and convert them into acids, like the ones in Granny Smith apples and lemons. The microcritters also churn out a smorgasbord of flavors and aromas. The result is a brew that has all the complexity of a wine and the zing of a Sour Patch Kid.

“Sour beers are tart like a raspberry or strawberry, but a lot of them are dry, like Champagne,” Wallash says. So their taste sits somewhere between an ale, wine and cider, he says. “It will definitely change your expectation about what a beer tastes like. It’s a new flavor experience all together.”

And one that you might not like right away.

“When I first tried a sour, I was shocked,” says Patrick Rue ofThe Bruery in Placentia, Calif. “I thought it had spoiled, and I threw the rest of the beer down the drain.”

But it was too late for Rue. He had been bitten by the sour bug and went on to make some of the first sour beers in Southern California, including the popular Tart of Darkness.

In traditional beer-making, yeast is added to boiled grains to ferment the sugars into alcohol. Then the brew is ready for bottling.

But for sour beers, the process doesn’t stop there. Brewers also add the bacteria Lactobacillus and Pediococcus. Sometimes they’ll include a dash of Brettanomyces, a type of wild yeast that makes cherry, mango and pineapple flavors as well as an earthy aroma that some call funky, horsey or leathery

The alternative approach for brewing sours is to go old-school and just let all the wild yeast and bacteria in the air drop into the beer naturally. It’s risky but — when done right — can produce magnificent beer.

That’s the strategy Ron Jeffries atJolly Pumpkin in Dexter, Mich., uses. He’s a pioneer of the sour movement in America, and he made some of the first commercial sours way back in 2004.

“There’s wild yeast and bacteria everywhere, especially if there are orchards nearby,” Jeffries tells The Salt. “When you make a happy home for them in your barrels, they just show up and spontaneously ferment — and sour — a beer.”

“For thousands of years, all beer had sour notes to it,” Jeffries says. “It was refreshing and crisp because people didn’t understand how to keep things clean.

“Then with pasteurization, refrigeration and an understanding of how to keep cultures free of bacteria, beers started to become nonsour,” he says.

A handful of breweries in Belgium continued to produce sour beers, known as lambics, Flanders ales and guezes. But it’s craft breweries in America that are making them fashionable again.

“They’re taking the beer style in crazy directions, just like they did with IPAs and porters,” Jeffries says. “The reason why you’re seeing sour beers gaining popularity is because they taste great, but also because of the creativity of American brewers.”

(Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/2013/10/15/234914933/pucker-up-america-beers-are-going-sour)

‘Tis the Season for Winter Craft Beers

We’ve made a list and checked it twice of some of this year’s most anticipated winter seasonals. The flavors and smells indicative of the winter months—cinnamon, spruce, allspice, gingerbread and smoke—are on display in these craft beers that will bring a new dimension to your holiday table. Here’s a list of some great beer to check out this holiday season:

1. Samichlaus

The king of Christmas beers, Samichlaus is the highlight of the holiday season for many beer enthusiasts. It is a rich, aged doppelbock brewed at the Austrian brewery Schloss Eggenberg.

2. Samuel Adams Winter Classics Mix Pack

This mix pack contains a variety of beers. This makes it a nice way to try some unusual beer for beer lovers who are just discovering craft beer. Though it can change from year to year the mix pack often contains Boston LagerOld Fezziwig AleWinter LagerHoliday PorterBlack Lager, andCranberry Lambic.

3. Sierra Nevada Celebration Ale

How do you say Merry Christmas to a hop-head? With a six pack of Celebration Ale from Sierra Nevada. Besides have a pretty significant bitterness at 62 IBUs, this beer is also dry hopped which raises the hops in the aroma and flavor.

4. Samuel Smiths Winter Welcome Ale

Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome is a traditional winter warmer and in many ways has served as the modern benchmark for the style. It is big in flavor and alcohol. Though maltiness dominates it does have a good bit of balancing hops as well as hints of apples and caramel.

5. Odell Brewing Co. Isolation Ale

Odell Brewing brews Isolation Ale as their winter seasonal. This beer is packed with hops character without a lot of the bitterness. It’s a bit unusual as a wintertime beer in that it does not carry the huge, dark malt flavors of many of the others.

6. Avery Brewing Old Jubilation

This is one of those examples of artful, adjunct free beers. Avery brews some pretty amazing beer using only the four traditional ingredients.

Old Jubilation certainly fits in the winter warmer category. With heaps of malt and 8% alcohol, this complex and tasty beer will make a welcome addition to your holiday bar.

7. Bush Noël (Scaldis Noël in the US)

This is how the Belgians make a winter warmer. This beer is rich with lots of malt. Though malt dominates, the complexity from the wilder yeasts Belgians tend to use plus the unusual practice of aging this beer with hops flowers in the vats for four to six weeks, gives this brew unique flavor and character.

8. Schlafly Christmas Ale

If you’re looking for a beer with all of the traditional yuletide flavors, this is it. Schlafly adds cloves and orange peel to this medium bodied ale. This beer says “Christmas” in a very straight forward way.

9. Young’s Winter Warmer

Young’s beers are always solid beers and generally excellent examples of style. Their Winter Warmer is a middle of the road warmer. This would be a good beer to have on hand if your some of guests might not be up to the challenge of some of the bigger beers that I’ve listed above.

10. Your Local Brewery

OK, so this is not a specific beer but I cannot let this opportunity pass on my personal mission to get more people to drink local beer. While I’ve listed some popular beers here that can help you celebrate the season – and there are many, many others – do not overlook that brewery that’s making great beer just a few miles or perhaps even just a few blocks from you. Personally I have two local breweries that make perfectly wonderful winter brews and stopping in for a fresh pint is always a treat. While you should head to the good beer store to stock up on some great seasonal brews you should also stop at the local brewery and see what they’ve whipped up.

(source: http://beer.about.com/od/beerrecommendations/tp/10WinterBeers.htm)

 

15 Beer and Wine Facts That May Surprise You

Did you know?

1) One glass of wine is drunk for every three bottles of beer.

 

2) Wine is nearly 50 percent stronger than beer.

 

3) The global beer industry is forecast to have a value of $496.6 billion in 2014. The global wine industry is expected to reach $327.8 billion in 2016.

 

4) Snow Beer in China is the most popular beer, with 74.8 million barrels sold in 2012.

 

5) The four key ingredients in beer are water, yeast, malt and hops. The key ingredient in wine? Grapes.

 

6) In Czech Republic, the average person drinks 346 12-ounce bottles of beer per year — the most of any other country.

 

7) Vatican City consumes more wine than any other country at 365 glasses per year, per person.

 

8) The world’s most expensive wine costs $168,000 per bottle. It is Penfolds Limited Edition Ampoule from Australia. Only 12 bottles exist worldwide.

 

9) Pale lagers and pilsners account for the top 10 most popular beer brands in the world.

 

10) At 65 percent alcohol by volume, Armageddon from Brewmaster in Scotland is the world’s strongest beer.

 

11) Sherry wine has the highest alcohol content by volume at 22 percent, followed by Port Wine at 20 percent.

 

12) At 15 percent per volume, Barley Wine has the highest alcohol content among beer.

 

13) Barley Wine is called ‘wine’ because of its high alcohol content but is actually a style of ale.

 

14) Beer contains high levels of silicon, which have been found to increase mineral density in bones, according to researchers.

 

15) Beer is easiest on the kidneys among alcoholic beverages because it has the highest water content.

 

 

Surprising Uses for Beer

Aside from the numero uno use for beer–drinking! woohoo!–it is one of the most over-looked components of many a DIY solution to common household conundrums. Here are alternative ways to put your brew to good use:

Boost Your Bounce
Limp, lifeless hair bringing you down? Drink a beer and maybe you won’t really care, or better yet, use a beer rinse to restore bounce and body. The vitamin B and natural sugars in beer add body and shine, while acting as a natural setting lotion that increases resilience, vitality, and hold. Pour one cup of beer into a glass and allow it to go flat and warm. Shampoo and rinse hair as usual. Pour the flat warm beer on your hair and work it through. Rinse thoroughly with cool water.

Say Sayonara to Slugs and Snails
I have a hard time snuffing out any creatures in the garden, but truth be told, slugs and snails can wreak all too much havoc on the green growing things. Rather than harsh chemicals or the old sizzle-with-salt method, beer may be the kinder option. Bury a clean container (like an empty juice carton cut length-wise in half) in the area where you’ve seen the pests, so that the the top is about one-half inch higher than ground level, and pour in leftover beer. Slugs and snails will be drawn to it, fall in, and drown. Not pretty, I know, but neither are holes in your spinach.

Conquer Stubborn Stains
Getting coffee or tea stains out of your rug may seem as feasible as getting water out of a rock, but beer can be a miracle worker in this field. Color test a small non-visible area first and allow to dry. If all looks well, then time to tackle the stain: douse it in beer, blot, repeat.

Put Out a Fire
Who needs 9-1-1 when you have beer? Kidding. Although certainly not as effective as a real fire extinguisher, a can or bottle of beer can be used in some cases. Because of the water content and pressure, you can shake a can or bottle and unleash the liquid on the fire. This is not for grease fires or electrical fires, really only for tiny paper fires or grill flare-ups–I’ve also heard of people who carry an emergency can in their car in case of engine fire.

Marinate Meat and Mushrooms
Beer is slightly acidic and works as a great on-hand tenderizer that isn’t as acidic in flavor as wine or vinegar based marinades. Use a hearty-flavored beer like a stout or barley wine, poke a few holes in the meat or mushrooms, add any other herbs or spices, and allow to marinate in the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight. And tempted as you might be: do not drink the marinade.

Polish Pots
In the past, dregs of beer from spent kegs was collected and used to polish the copper vats in breweries. Because of beer’s subtle acidity, it can help boost shine without staining the metal like a higher-acidity liquid would. Try an inconspicuous test spot first–dampen a soft towel with beer, and buff.

rap Fruit Flies
They say you can catch more flies with honey? Maybe they haven’t tried beer. Anyone with an indoor compost bin or worm farm had probably experienced a plague of fruit flies at some point. But guess what, not only do fruit flies dig fermenting organic matter, they love them some beer. Try this: put some beer in a cup; cut the corner off of a sandwich bag and place the cut corner in the cup; folding the rest around the cup and securing with a rubber band. Place the cup in the bin and say good bye to little flying guys.

(Source http://www.care2.com/greenliving/9-surprising-uses-for-beer.html#ixzz2hpNyz5j7)

 

Carlsberg’s latest campaign gets you to share beers instead of links

Carlsberg can be quite creative when it comes to online advertisements such as this one but their latest drinks campaign in Belgium is another smart effort in promoting the brand. Creating an app called Tournée Digitale (Digital Tour), it encourages users to step away from their computers and meet their friends in person and share beers instead of links.

When you download the app, you are automatically entered into a competition where the winners get a free round of beer to share with their friends. When this happens, the app allows you to invite five of your friends to a Carlsberg event or party so you can share your drinks. You can give your Carlsburg drinks their very own name – so long as it ends with the suffix ‘sberg’ – when you’re sharing the free beers.

The final step of treating your friends is to share the news on your Facebook page about being treated by Carlsberg, thus promoting the brand to your other friends as well as a wider audience. The app is available for both iPhone and Android smartphones.

– See more at: http://www.simplyzesty.com/Blog/Article/August-2011/Carlsberg-s-latest-campaign-gets-you-to-share-beers-instead-of-links#sthash.pMU0HlNs.dpuf